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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Private Land holder

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2017                     End Date: 2018

Site ID: SA01362SA1

Area (Ha): 220 Ha paddock

 

Project Aim

Many growers in lower rainfall areas of the Wheatbelt are looking to minimise risk and increase efficiency. Growing your own nitrogen (brown manuring of legume pastures) or increasing soil water and decreasing weed/disease issues through chemical fallows are becoming more common. This trial would like to compare the economics of these systems. Legume pasture treatments of Lupins and a Lupin/Vetch mix will be compared alongside a chemical fallow with soil nutrients and soil moisture being measured in order to determine potential yield of the following crop. As this is only a one year trial, the potential yield at seeding (determined by soil moisture), the inputs required to grow this (determined from soil testing at seeding) and pasture establishment costs/fallow chemical costs will be used to estimate the most economically beneficial system.

The project aims to compare the economic benefits of ‘growing your own nitrogen’ through the use of legume pastures (trialling lupins and a vetch/lupin mix) against the economic benefits of increasing soil moisture through use of a chemical fallow.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, private landholders

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 9670 3121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2017                     End Date: 2018

Site ID: SA01309SA1

Area (Ha): 

Project Aim

Deep ripping work to date on farm and in other regions of the Wheatbelt has shown very positive results. It appears ripping with inclusion plates is incorporating lime to depth and allowing plants to penetrate deeper into the soil profile. This allows the plants to access nutrients and water that would be otherwise unavailable to plants, reducing the need for energy hungry fertilisers.

 

While deep ripping with inclusion plates is not innovative per se, its usefulness for much of the Wheatbelt region is unknown and most profitable ripping depth, unclear. The innovative aspect of this project is that the deep ripping will be conducted down to 700mm and investigated on three different soil types typical to the Wheatbelt region to determine which soil types are most responsive to ripping at this depth.

The aim of this project is to quantify the crop yield benefits and nutrient recovery and water use efficiency improvements from deep ripping with inclusion plates down to 700mm across three different typical Wheatbelt soil types.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Liebe Group

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 9670 3121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2017                     End Date: 2018

Site ID: SA01305SA1

Area (Ha): 0.288ha

Project Aim

This trial aims to determine impacts of long term rotations and input levels on profitability and system sustainability.

The initial aim of the long-term trial was to examine the difference in profitability between low and high cropping practices. From 2012-2015 the trial was funded by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture with a focus on the effect that the rotation and inputs were having on soil carbon levels. The focus has now changed direction with growers concerned about how long it takes to rundown a system on continuous wheat.

This project will investigate the impact of rotations on crop nutrition in our low rainfall area. This will be done by identifying and quantifying the nutrition levels present in each of the rotations to see the effect of the rotations on nutrition, better quantifying the benefits of break crops.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, AgInnovate, Private Land holders

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2016                     End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA01314SA1

Area (Ha): 42 ha at Pingelly site & 5 ha at Cunderdin site

Project Aim

 

Grain and Graze have shown in trials in the Eastern States and on the South Coast of WA, that sowing winter type crop varieties in spring can better utilize summer rain to provide summer/autumn grazing for livestock, and harvestable grain in the following spring. Winter types have a vernalisation requirement, that is, they need to get cold before they flower, and therefore suit spring sowing as they will not flower until after the following winter. It has also been shown that there are advantages of incorporating summer forage crops in the mixed farming system.

Most paddocks grazed in the WA Wheatbelt in summer and autumn are crop stubbles or dry pasture paddocks. Sowing summer crops, e.g. sorghum and millet are practices that have been utilized in WA especially after summer rainfall events. The feed produced by summer crops has been used successfully to improve the nutritional status of grazing livestock. Millet and sorghum have been grown on a small scale in the Wheatbelt, but have also tended to be grown closer to the coast where the rainfall is higher and the summer temperatures are cooler.

This project will test the establishment and growth of winter grain and summer legume crop varieties further inland (on two sites Pingelly & Cunderdin) where the growing season is shorter and summer temperatures are hotter. If the trial is successful, it may allow our traditionally winter farming system to take advantage of summer rainfall.

Varieties to be trialed:

Global Sunn is a new summer growing forage legume that fixes nitrogen, which may improve the yields of the following crops.

Super Dan 2 is a sudan grass hybrid, especially suited to grazing by sheep.

Winter type crops Hyola 970 canola and Manning wheat have both been grown using autumn sowing in WA, but not in spring in the WA wheatbelt, where they will have to survive in a hot dry climate.

Key Questions to be answered in this research:

  1. That winter type grain crops can be seeded in the Wheatbelt in spring and survive over summer to grow successfully in the following season.
  2. That there are viable grazing opportunities and harvestable grain for these winter types in a hotter drier environment than previously tested.
  3. That leguminous summer crops sown in spring provide benefits apart from grazing to the following autumn sown crop, when compared to a more traditional grass type forage crop.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Corrigin Farm Improvement Group

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2016                     End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00762SA1

Area (Ha): 0.8 ha

Project Aim

There are more than 2 million hectares of non-wetting sandy soils in western and southern Australia. Water repellency in soils causes uneven water infiltration, poor crop and pasture germination and leaves the soil prone to wind and water erosion. This also causes poor weed resistance, exacerbating herbicide resistance, and also leads to inefficient nutrient use in cropping and pasture systems.

Non-wetting soils are a significant constraint in the Corrigin area, with water repellence resulting in poor germination of crops and pastures.  The Corrigin Farm Improvement Group (CFIG) has identified non-wetting soil as a major issue for their members and have been exploring cost effective ways growers are able to manage these soil to reduce water repellence and improve crop and pasture vigor.

There are a number of treatment options for non-wetting soils, with mechanical techniques and soil wetters achieving good results in a number of trials elsewhere in the Wheatbelt. This project will specifically examine 5 treatments for non-wetting soils, including:

  • One way disc plough
  • Spading
  • Bi-Agra Band wetter agent
  • SE14 SACOA wetter agent
  • 90mm knife points

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Facey Grower Group

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2016                     End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00671SA1

Area (Ha): 2.3 ha

Project Aim

As rainfall becomes less predictable and agricultural input costs increase, landowners in the Facey grower group region (around Wickepin) have identified a need for drought tolerant summer grazing options rather than traditional options more suited to higher rainfall zones. Having a reliable feed source during summer and autumn has the potential to reduce the need for hand feeding resulting in less expense, time and labor requirements by landowners and can stabilize the soils during summer months.

Members of the Facey grower group have identified Tedera as a potential option to fill the summer feed gap for livestock. Tedera (Bituminaria bituminosa var. albomarginata) is a perennial forage legume with drought tolerant qualities which is relatively new to WA and is not commonly used in the Wickepin/Facey Group region. Extensive field trials during 2005-2008 identified Tedera as one of the most productive and persistent species in southern Australia, mainly due to its retention of green leaves and drought tolerance compared with the industry standard perennial legume, Lucerne (Mayfield 2011).

This trial will determine if Tedera is a suitable and productive pasture in the region by monitoring its establishment and production compared to more commonly used annual pastures.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Far Eastern Agricultural Region (FEAR), Individual Landholder

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00672SA1

Area (Ha): Site 1 (4.04 ha), Site 2 (4.2 ha)

 

Project Aim

To develop a forage-pasture system that improves soil health and profitability in low performing paddocks in the eastern Wheatbelt

Project Description

Farming in the far eastern Wheatbelt needs to have very low input costs, relative to yield, in order to make the business profitable. Soil health issues in these areas can make it unprofitable to crop some areas and it is important to develop low cost options that can address these issues and improve whole of farm profitability. This project will examine the integration of forage shrubs, with legume pastures, into a section of a paddock that is not cropped due to degradation, which is suspected to be caused by salinity, to address areas of declining soil health.

Having successful legume pastures with forage shrubs will provide livestock with diverse feed and shelter, stabilize soil erosion, improve soil health and potentially provide nutrients for future cropping with minimal input costs. The shrubs will be planted into poor productivity areas, with an inter-row spacing that is wide enough to accommodate the boom spray. These inter-rows will be sown with a summer legume pasture, to take advantage of summer rainfall that is more prevalent in the far eastern Wheatbelt. It is anticipated that the overall profitability of the paddock will be increased, by reducing input costs lost on low yielding areas, improving grazing potential and increasing yield in the inter-row due to improvements in soil health. The activity should also reduce further spread of soil degradation within the paddock.

Tanya Kilminster and Greg Shae of DAWFA are the technical advisors for the project. Pasture and forage establishment will be monitored aswell as sheep DSE and number of grazing days.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Liebe Group

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2017                       End Date: 2018

Site ID: SA01305SA1

Area (Ha): 0.288 ha

 

Project Aim

This trial aims to determine impacts of long term rotations and input levels on profitability and system sustainability.

Project Description

In 2011, the Liebe group established a long-term rotational trial to evaluate a continuous wheat system compared to other crop rotations, all with high and low input levels (seed and fertiliser). One of the initial focuses of the trial was to determine the effect different rotations and inputs levels were having on soil carbon levels. Due to local farmer interest, the trials’ focus has now shifted towards understanding how long it takes to rundown a system on continuous wheat.

2013 aside (enforced chemical fallow), wheat treatments have been back to back since 2011 with the most profitable system being continuous, low input wheat. The question many growers want to know now is, how long can this system be pushed before issues such as weeds, diseases and nutritional deficiencies start coming into play and profits are compromised as a result? To help quantify this, an economic analysis has been conducted for each treatment to date and will be conducted for the 2017 trial year.

In addition, nutrition of crops in each of the rotations will be measured to in order to try to quantify the benefits of break crops. Nutrient use efficiency will also be determined for the high and low input systems and compared.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Merredin and District Farm Improvement Group & MapIQ

Contact: Lizzie Von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonPerger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00674SA1

Area (Ha): 18 ha

 

Project Aim

Surface only application of lime will be tested against incorporation via shallow leading tyne deep ripping to quantify the impact this has on speed of subsoil pH increase. Additionally, a locally sourced lime will be compared with a commercially available coastal lime source.

Project Description

Many farmers are looking for a solution to subsurface soil acidity and particularly, how to speed up the process of ameliorating the acidity. Surface applied lime seems to be sufficient to arrest subsurface soil pH decline though may not increase soil pH fast enough for farmers to realise an acceptable rate of return on this investment.

The recommended rate of lime application has increased from 1 t/ha to 2 t/ha or more, due to improved production on most farms that has led to an increased rate of acidification. Additionally, best management practice currently suggests that higher rates of lime application may be required where sub-soil pH levels are also low. This higher application rate, combined with incorporation techniques, can help address acid surface and subsurface soils and can be targeted at areas that are likely to provide the highest return on investment.

Given high transport costs, establishing the greatest return on investment for different lime application rates in the central and eastern Wheatbelt is a priority. Similarly, lower quality ‘secondary carbonate’ sources that are available locally may provide a competitive return on investment due to lower transport and supply costs despite requiring higher application rates.

This trial will compare different application rates with and without incorporation (deep ripping) of commercially available lime and a locally sourced lime in a replicated strip trial design.

Project Outputs

Indicative results:

  • Surface lime had no impact and yields of surface limed plots equalled the control plot (1.54 t/ha)
  • Ripping only increased yield by 320 kg/ha (1.86 t/ha)
  • Ripping + lime increased yield by an average of 470 kg/ha, an increase of 150 kg/ha on top of ripping (2.01 t/ha)
  • Ripping + 13t/ha Local lime had the same yield as Ripping + 6t/ha Lime sand
  • Ripping was the main driver of yield increases
  • Ripping + lime gave the largest yield increases

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2016

Site ID: SA00530SA2

Area (Ha): 610(Ha)

 

Project Aim

This project aims to demonstrate the benefits of soil testing to depth (up to 30 cm) and therefore increase wider adoption of the practice. The soil test results will be used to determine the best management practices to improve the soil pH and health and ultimately crop yields.

Project Description

Soil samples will be collected from the depths  0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-30 cm. pH and a comprehensive nutrient analysis will be completed for the topsoil samples (0-10 cm) and pH analysed for the subsoil samples (10-20 cm & 20-30 cm).  The soil test results will be used to determine best soil management practices in order to increase efficiency and productivity.

 Project Outputs

The soil test results showed that acidification (low pH) was a significant issue in the subsoil of the focus paddock and quite likely to be limiting crop productivity. pH of the topsoil was good. This highlights the importance of soil testing to depth. Most Wheatbelt growers test the topsoil, however, acidity in the subsoil in many cases is of greater concern.

The grower now has more information enabling him to take a more targeted approach to lime applications and liming rates have been increased to 2 t/ha with 300 kg/ha gypsum. The grower is also considering the benefits of incorporating lime to depth either by ploughing or deep ripping.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00792SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00779SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00798SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00798SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00781SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00795SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00800SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00789SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00794SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00790SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

 

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00783SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00780SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00782SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00785SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00786SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact:  Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00796SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00788SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00799SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00791SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10 cm, 10-30 cm and 30-50 cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 9670 3106

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                   End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00779SA2

Project Aim

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program (as a whole) aims to assist farmers to improve their soil health and crop performance whilst reducing nutrient export to waterways by developing their skills and knowledge in nutrient management. Soil testing to depth and plant tissue analysis will be used to identify key soil constraints and opportunities for improved management. This project site is part of a multiple site trial, focusing on Nutrient Use Efficiency in catchments that have been identified as having the largest impact on water quality in the Avon/Swan River.

Project Description

The Nutrient Use Efficiency Program will provide farmers with the opportunity to assess their nutrient use efficiency on a nominated site. Soil samples will be collected from the depths 0-10cm, 10-30cm and 30-50cm and analysed along with plant tissue samples taken from the same set locations.  This soil/plant data as well as the paddock history information and yield results will be used to determine nutrient balances and assist in understanding the soil constraints that may be limiting crop uptake of nutrients from soil.  Wheatbelt NRM along with industry experts, will work with growers to evaluate management practices and highlight where efficiency gains may be made.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2016                       End Date: 2018

Site ID: SA00752SA1

Area (Ha): 1359 ha

 

Project Aim

To use legume pastures and fallow rotations to reduce weed burden and improve soil health in low rainfall areas.

Project Description

Generally, the current farm practice to reclaim weed burdened and low fertility land is to allocate part of the farm (20-40%) to unproductive fallow for 1 or 2 years to control troublesome and resistant weed populations. However, particularly in low rainfall regions, fallow vegetation is inevitably of very low quality and clover based pastures often lack biomass and are too inconsistent to help with uniform soil fertility. Also, fallow paddocks are spray-topped in the early spring to prevent weed-seed set, but this does not guarantee that resistant weeds will be destroyed. Further, sheep grazing upon poor volunteer pastures are normally run at low stocking rates due to unstable soil structure and lack of biomass so farmers face associated costs of additional feed to maintain stock condition, or are unable to stock these areas.

Instead of using chemical fallow for multiple years, the land owners will trial using premium legume pastures and analyse their effectiveness for weed management and soil health and structure benefits in a low rainfall zone. The trial will also identify the appropriate herbicide package needed to maintain the system successfully in a cropping rotation.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 96703100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00022SA1

Area (Ha): 79 ha

 

Project Aim

To evaluate various mechanical soil amelioration techniques used to improve subsoil acidity, both with and without lime (chemical amelioration).

Project Description

Water Use Efficiency (WUE) is a key driver to optimizing yields and being sustainable in lower rainfall districts.  Crops need to be able to access the sub-soil to make full use of the soil moisture, but sub-soil constraints such as acidity, limit WUE. Soil acidification is recognized as a major soil constraint that is threatening both agricultural economic and natural resource throughout the productive agriculture areas of Western Australia.  It is one of the few soil constraints that can be treated, but questions remain about what is the best incorporation method (if at all), how long will the benefits last and is it economical (particularly in the WA central and eastern Wheatbelt).  All of these questions become key to its adoption.

Since the early nineties an extensive liming program has been implemented across the trial property, with many parts receiving in excess of 5 t/ha.  This has addressed the top soil pH, however pH levels in the subsoils (15-30cm) in many parts of the farm is still low and is potentially limiting access to water and nutrients.

This project will compare the incorporation of zero or 2t/ha of lime sand with deep ripping, one-way plough and spader combinations in a replicated plot trial, measuring their effects on crop production.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Evergreen Farming Inc., UWA Future Farm,  Individual Landowner

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 96703100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00018SA1

Area (Ha): 44.3 ha

 

Project Aim

To establish perennial pastures within a background of annual pastures in areas subject to enroaching salinity and poor soil structure.

Project Description

The aim of the project is to establish demonstration trials of perennial pastures on mixed farm properties at two locations (Pingelly & Northam) which currently only use annual pastures for sheep production. The project will evaluate the success of establishing perennial pastures on paddocks that have previously used annual pastures with poor success as they are subject to encroaching salinity and poor soil structure.

It is hoped that maintaining year long active plant production will reduce erosion, build soil carbon, increase biological activity and soil health during summer months and provide feed for livestock year round.

The project will:

1) Demonstrate the comparative success of establishment of different perennial pasture species under each districts practice grazing.

2) Increase the knowledge of how to successfully establish perennial pastures compared to current annual pastures over 2 sites.

3) Demonstrate soil health changes under different pasture species.

4) Show the robustness of the perennial pasture system by running the trial over 2 locations.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Curtin University (with support from Greening Australia) and Corrigin Farm Improvement Group

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA01029SA1

Area (Ha): 0.75 ha

 

Project Aim

Project Aim

  • Demonstrate that old saltbush stands can be regenerated and that regeneration can improve production by increasing species diversity and biomass of the understorey and improve feed availability for livestock
  • Provide landholders with an economic analysis of regenerating old saltbush compared to the cost of removing and replanting
  • Provide landholders with a number of options on how to turn old stands into a useable, profitable and manageable resource

Project Description

Many old plantings of saltbush are over-grown, with many having been planted too close together for effective management, and are now too tall for livestock to be able to harvest the available feed effectively. Close and overgrown saltbush also leads to limited regeneration of the pasture understorey, and thus poor biodiversity and overall feed value. This means that although they have been successful in the reclamation of degraded land in terms of potentially reducing soil erosion, rising salinity or waterlogging, the plantings have not proved to be an economic resource for landholders as they have not fulfilled their potential to provide feed for livestock particularly during periods of annual feed gap.

Currently, landholders with old, overgrown saltbush stands are seeking guidance and information on management options to re-incorporate the areas back into their livestock management. However, there is no information available on ways to regenerate old saltbush stands and improve their grazing potential. This negative experience of landholders with the use of saltbush as a feed resource is likely to be a major barrier to the wider adoption of forage systems, and it is therefore important to demonstrate techniques that improve these systems. Recent research from programmes such as those supported by the CRC FFI have also generated new knowledge on forage shrub agronomy, but this has focused on newly established systems and has not been applied to improving older saltbush plantings.

This project will compare different regeneration techniques of rolling and cutting old saltbush stands in a replicated strip trial design at 2 sites in Goomalling and Corrigin. Understory diversity and biomass as well as saltbush regrowth will be monitored and analysed.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2016                       End Date: 2018

Site ID: SA00364SA1

Area (Ha): 157 ha

 

Project Aim

Find suitable, nitrogen fixing, pasture species for heavy soil types to improve livestock carrying capacity and increase grazing days in a low rainfall region.

Project Description

Legume pastures can provide livestock feed, improve soil health and, once established, can reduce weed competition in paddocks. These benefits can make it a handy rotational option in cropping systems. However, the options for legume pastures on heavy clay soils in the dryer regions of the WA eastern Wheatbelt are limited and have variable success. This trial will test the establishment and use of different nitrogen fixing pasture species on heavy soil types in the Eastern Wheatbelt where sub clovers have had poor success.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Curtin University (with support from Greening Australia) and Corrigin Farm Improvement Group

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA01029SA1

Area (Ha): 0.75 ha

Project Aim

  • Demonstrate that old saltbush stands can be regenerated and that regeneration can improve production by increasing species diversity and biomass of the understorey
  • Provide landholders with an economic analysis of regenerating old saltbush compared to the cost of removing and replanting
  • Provide landholders with a number of options on how to turn old stands into a useable, profitable and manageable resource

Project Description

Many old plantings of saltbush are over-grown, with many having been planted too close together for effective management, and are now too tall for livestock to be able to harvest the available feed effectively. Close and overgrown saltbush also leads to limited regeneration of the pasture understorey, and thus poor biodiversity and overall feed value. This means that although they have been successful in the reclamation of degraded land in terms of potentially reducing soil erosion, rising salinity or waterlogging, the plantings have not proved to be an economic resource for landholders as they have not fulfilled their potential to provide feed for livestock particularly during periods of annual feed gap.

Currently, landholders with old, overgrown saltbush stands are seeking guidance and information on management options to re-incorporate the areas back into their livestock management. However, there is no information available on ways to regenerate old saltbush stands and improve their grazing potential. This negative experience of landholders with the use of saltbush as a feed resource is likely to be a major barrier to the wider adoption of forage systems, and it is therefore important to demonstrate techniques that improve these systems. Recent research from programmes such as those supported by the CRC FFI have also generated new knowledge on forage shrub agronomy, but this has focused on newly established systems and has not been applied to improving older saltbush plantings.

This project will compare different regeneration techniques of rolling and cutting old saltbush stands in a replicated strip trial design at 2 sites in Goomalling and Corrigin. Understory diversity and biomass as well as saltbush regrowth will be monitored and analysed.

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, WA No Till Farmers Assoc.

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2016                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00675SA1

Area (Ha): 

 

Project Aim

This trial aims to improve the soil’s ability to wet-up and increase the canola crop’s germination and yield by using summer scout crops prior to plant the canola break crop.

 

Project Description

This project will investigate soil scouting crops to improve canola establishment and yields on non-wetting sands. As we continue to experience increased spring/summer rainfall the concept of summer cropping becomes more feasible, allowing us to investigate the benefits and economic option to have crops growing 9 months of the year instead of 5-6. The inclusion of good break crops in the rotation is essential to keep the cereal crops productive, maintaining ground cover and improve soil health.

Poor establishment of the popular break crop canola on sandy non-wetting soils can be due to low ground cover and erosion, as is the case at this trial site. This trial will explore whether sowing legume and grass ‘scouting’ crops in spring (early October) into a cereal rye brown manure can improve the subsequent canola crop establishment and production, helping to restore the paddock’s overall productivity. By combining accurate GPS sowing and zero tillage, to minimise soil disturbance,  the trial aims to take advantage of the additional root pathways to assist water entering the soil after rainfall, as well as provide easy to follow root pathways for the canola crop.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00014A1

Area (Ha): 32.9 ha

 

Project Aim

This project aims to demonstrate that forage shrubs, that have been focal species in the CSIRO Enrich project, can be incorporated into productive and multi-function sandalwood plantations.

 

Project Description

This site will consist of a selection legume and non legume hosts that will be cultivated to achieve grazing and sandalwood silviculture objectives.

Novel systems that contain Enrich fodder shrubs will be bench marked against standard industry practice (ie small plots of monoculture hosts, biodiverse legume hosts established within the main plot) .

The main plot will contain both high and low density fodder shrub areas for future comparison.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, WA Sandalwood Plantations

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 9670 3100

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2016                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA01051SA1

Area (Ha): 201 ha (site 1) and 57 ha (site 2)

 

Project Aim

Evaluate the response of mid rotation sandalwood to fertiliser treatments.

The trial aims to show:

  • The growth rate response of sandalwood trees to the addition of fertilizer
  • The heartwood development of sandalwood trees after fertilisers added

These data will be used to develop recommendations for fertiliser use in sandalwood systems

 

Project Description

The trial will use 2 different fertiliser treatments over 3 different soil types and measure the response in sandalwood growth.

The objective of this study is to investigate the response of mid-rotation (i.e. age 7 to 8 years old) Australian Sandalwood plantations to two fertiliser treatments (NPK and NPK+trace elements) on three representative soil types (deep sand, sandy duplex and loamy duplex) to determine the potential for fertiliser application on:

  • Tree growth response (biomass accumulation) – based on stem diameter measurements; and
  • Heartwood development – to be measured by destructive tree sampling.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

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Bolt-on biological strategies for orchard soil health
July 62016

Aiming to improve tree health by promoting soil biology, this project will demonstrate three different strategies to promote soil biology and track their effect on tree health, fruit yield and fruit quality.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Marron Growers Association of WA

Contact: Wendy Wilkins (SWCC – Bridgetown).  Ph: 9761 4184

Email: wendy.wilkins@swccnrm.org.au

Website: SWCC Sustainable Agriculture

Start Date:  May 2016                     End Date: March 2018

Site ID:  IN2.1.012

Size Are Ha: 2.1ha

Project Aim

The project’s aims are to study the effects of the addition of pre-selected trace elements on natural
productivity and yield in juvenile marron (Cherax cainii) in farm ponds. Subsidiary aims are:

  • To study the effect of the addition of pre-selected trace elements on phytoplankton and
    zooplankton abundance.
  • To compare the effect of the addition of pre-selected trace elements on two life stages of
    marron (juvenile and grow-out stages).
  • To study the species diversity of phytoplankton and their role in marron survival and how
    this may affect specific growth rates.
  • To study the abundance and species diversity of zooplankton and their role in marron
    survival and how this may affect specific growth rates.

Methodology

The natural productivity of a number of ponds has been determined and the results show that the presence of various zooplankton species such as rotifers is higher in ponds with higher levels of manganese. This preliminary analysis of trace element concentrations of pond water and the natural productivity in those marron ponds indicates that the ponds having higher levels of manganese, calcium, silica and zinc tend to have elevated phytoplankton and zooplankton productivity as compared to other ponds. The available initial data is based on different life stages of marron (juveniles, grow-out and brooders), as well as on data from 10 grow-out monosex ponds (5 female and 5 male).

Based on this initial data from the marron ponds, the trial will be carried out to study the effect of trace elements on pond productivity in ponds with juvenile marron and others with grow-out marron.

Trial 1: There are eleven juvenile ponds and they will be treated as follows:

  1. Treatments 1 and 2: Three juvenile ponds treated with four selected trace elements (manganese, calcium, silica and zinc with different concentrations) at two concentrations each (total 6 ponds).
  2. Treatment 3: Three juvenile ponds treated with all 12 pre-selected trace elements.
  3. Two ponds will be used as controls.

Trial 2: Similarly, there are two monosex grow-out ponds (5 for males and 5 for females), which will be treated as follows:

  1. For these ponds, the treatment will be the use of selected trace elements (manganese, calcium, silica and zinc with different concentrations). Treatment will be the same for both male and female populations with triplicates.
  2. 2 control ponds for each sex.

Trial 3: There are nine brooder ponds to be used in this trial, which will be treated as follows:

  1. The first treatment will test the use of selected trace elements (manganese, calcium, silica and zinc) in triplicate (3 ponds).
  2. The second treatment will be with all pre-selected 12 trace elements, again in triplicate..
  3. Three ponds will be used as control.

The effect of trace element composition on growth and survival of marron will be compared at harvest for juvenile, male / female grow-out and brooder ponds.

Laboratory trials:

The growth and survival of marron will also be studied under laboratory conditions by using the same pre-selected trace elements. The culture of algae will be carried out in aquaria and the marron will be cultured to calculate growth and survival of marron. The treatments are the same for the laboratory experiments to observe the effect of addition of trace elements on growth of algae and marron under more controlled conditions.

Curtin University is a partner in this project.

*Join the growing number of farmers and industry advisers receiving trial updates by subscribing to SWCC’s Sustainable Agriculture E-newsletter.  Simply email wendy.wilkins@swccnrm.org.au with “Subscribe to SWAG” as the subject.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: University of Western Australia

Contact: Wendy Wilkins (SWCC – Bridgetown).  Ph: 9761 4184

Email: wendy.wilkins@swccnrm.org.au

Website: SWCC Sustainable Agriculture

Start Date:  May 2016                     End Date: Sept 2017

Site ID:  IN2.1.013

Size Are Ha: 12

Project Aim

The project’s aims are to compare different composts (compost produced on-farm dairy and commercially produced compost), manure (manure/effluent) and synthetic fertiliser treatments on three WA dairy farms in collaboration with a three-year study funded through current SWCC Project IN2.1.002. This project is also a continuation of an identical project that occurred from May 2015 to April 2016, and will enable longer analysis.  Value will be added by evaluating soil biological processes associated with soil carbon storage in these pastures receiving different fertiliser inputs including synthetic fertiliser, dairy effluent/manure, dairy compost (windrow system prepared by dairy farmer) and commercial MAF C-WISE compost (made from different waste streams). The fertiliser, composts and manures are already being characterized in terms of nutritive value as part of Project IN2.1.002. The project will determine whether applying compost to land promotes soil carbon and its associated microbes (community diversity, resilience, population size). Soil microbial community diversity will be determined using community profiling techniques (pyrosequencing or ion-tag sequencing of amplicons generated from the V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes).

The project’s objectives are to quantify:

  • microbial dominance associated with soil carbon retention in three dairy soils in response to compost application under field conditions; and
  • microbial dominance associated with soil carbon retention in three dairy soils in response to compost application under controlled glasshouse conditions.

Methodology

Soil carbon is an important issue in south-western Australia and it will become even more important with projected reductions in rainfall and increasing temperatures. The need to build and retain carbon in soil has many benefits in this environment for sustaining high quality agricultural productivity. Current research into the long-term addition of organic amendments to soil have been shown to improve carbon storage and nutrient availability, crop yield, soil microbial diversity and function, and soil resilience to heat and drought stress.

Dairy effluent and manures contain significant amounts of carbon and essential plant nutrients but these nutrients are often in a relatively dilute form making the transportation of large volumes of organic matter impractical and uneconomical. Low-cost composting technologies, such as, the Mobile Aerated floor (MAF) system being used at C-WISE converts different forms of organic waste material into high quality, carbon–rich, concentrated, balanced fertiliser/soil improver that have a higher economic and agronomic value and are easy to handle and transport. The MAF system requires minimal space and operational management (limited turning/machinery), making it a very attractive option to dairy farmers.

Soil organisms are involved in soil carbon transformations in soil. These processes are important for increasing and retaining soil carbon, but some are also involved in loss of soil carbon. Soil microbial communities respond to the addition of organic matter such as compost, and they play a role in the incorporation of carbon from compost into soil. Soil organisms also play a role in the breakdown of organic matter in soil and the balance of these processes leads to either the retention or loss of soil carbon over time. Compost addition to soil is expected to positively support soil microbial communities and contribute to resistance and resilience of the soil community.  Resistance is the ability of the microbial community to maintain its structure, and resilience is the ability of the microbial community to respond to severe impacts or disturbances.

Analysis on soil carbon is based on recent comprehensive evaluation of methodology and analyses.

To exploit the opportunity of on-farm composting of effluent on dairy farms, we will evaluate and quantify the extent to which composting enhances soil carbon and identify soil microbial processes associated with soil carbon retention following application of soil carbon.

*Join the growing number of farmers and industry advisers receiving trial updates by subscribing to SWCC’s Sustainable Agriculture E-newsletter.  Simply email wendy.wilkins@swccnrm.org.au with “Subscribe to SWAG” as the subject.

Media

“Composting manure” by Prof Lynette Abbott & Sasha Jenkins – Farm West News – May 2016, p12

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder, Precision Agronomics

Contact: Lizzie von Perger

Ph: 96703100

Email: lvonperger@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00351SA1

Area (Ha): 156 ha

 

Project Aim

To evaluate the use of variable rate technology for optimizing nutrient and water use efficiency relative to traditional farming practices.

 

This will be done using spatial radiometric and electromagnetic (EM) surveys, with soil testing to map PAWC and nutritional status of the soil and identify zones for VRT input.  The soil zonation mapping will then be incorporated with yield data and Yield Prophet modelling to optimize inputs using VRT and evaluate the impact on whole of paddock input budgets and overall profit.

 

Given the textural variability within these paddocks, and consequently PAWC and yield potential variability such practice is likely to greatly enhance the efficiency of nutrient use and whole of paddock profit.

 

Project Description

The most limiting factor of a crop’s yield potential is the soils ability to store plant available water. This is mainly determined by the soil texture and the roots ability to penetrate down the soil profile.

 

Plant Available Water-holding Capacity (PAWC) is difficult to measure directly but is an important soil property that determines yield, deep drainage and nitrate leaching in our Mediterranean-type environment.  Properly ground-truthed geophysical surveys can be used estimate the spatial distribution of soil types and approximations of PAWC.

 

By using radiometrics and electromagnetics (EM) surveys, soil testing, yield data and Yield Prophet to determine soil’s PAWC and nutritional status we can develop variable rate maps to apply inputs using satellite guidance (GPS) technology. This in turn can be used to tailor fertiliser application rates to soil type and increase overall nutrient use efficiencies.

 

Many farms in the Western Australian grain-belt are equipped with yield mapping technology and have the ability to apply fertilizer at variable rates across paddock, but farmers are unsure how to determine rates for different zones.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.


          

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015             End Date: 2017

Site ID:  SA000359SA1

Area (Ha): 5

 

Project Aim

The trial aims to show that combining profit with NRM can be achieved. That marginal land can be used for high-value stud livestock and that grazing pregnant ewes in forage systems can produce more adapted animals.

 

 

Project Description

A 5 ha trial will be established along a valley floor that already had some revegetation and forage plantings. The trial aims to show that introducing high value forage shrubs (eg Anameka and other ENRICH species) into areas with older forage shrub plantings can improve the overall productivity of the whole paddock. This will be compared against paddocks being grazed with unimproved pasture and cropping residue.

 

Background work

This trial aims to build on the finding of the Enrich Project that was finding that early life exposure (in-utero and/or lactation feeding) can affect how well animals perform on shrubs later in life (Perennial forage shrubs – from principles to practice for Australian farms). Enrich also found that fleece weight of offspring was increased by about 10% for at least 2 years after the pregnant ewes grazed a saltbush-based forage system (Revell pers.comms).

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00353SA1

Area (Ha): 6

 

Project Aim

This trial aims to demonstrate the level of work involved in planting and maintaining a bush food project on a commercial scale, the growth and production that can be expected from different bush food species when different levels of moisture are available, marketing opportunities of bush food within domestic/international market.

 

Project Description

A 6ha trial will be established on a small property to showcase bush food species and the agronomics of establishment of different species. This includes acacia species as host trees for quandong (Santalum acuminatum) and sandalwood (Santalum spicatum) and Acacia acuminata for wattle seed production. The trial will also plant bush tomatoes (Solanum centrale) and desert limes (Citrus glauca) and grow these with different watering regimes to show growth and fruiting ability with different levels of moisture.

 

Background

Bush tomatoes are currently being harvested from wild populations and grown by some indigenous communities in desert regions. These desert communities are using water-wise irrigation systems to increase the fruiting times from two normal months in the wild to eight months (http://www.outbackpride.com.au/species/kutjera-desert-raisin). This may be achievable in desert environments and we will be testing how this occurs in a south western location.

 

Desert limes have been grafted onto citrus stock for years in order to produce fruits earlier and more consistently. These root stocks require the same conditions as normal citrus, by varying the water stress levels we will determine how desert limes function (http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/99273/managing-citrus-orchards-with-less-water.pdf ).

 

The market for bush foods and products derived from sandalwood, quandong and wattle seed is also growing and they are increasingly being grown in the Wheatbelt. Combining the different bush foods will show how diversifying into different markets can influence the economic viability of one farm. While developing our understanding of whether the irrigation requirements in the Wheatbelt will help us to develop our knowledge of how to best integrate bush food based productions systems into Wheatbelt agricultural systems.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Land Holder

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 96703110

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014                        End Date: 2017

Site ID:  SA00359SA1

Area (Ha): 65

 

Project Aim

Achieve a productive, holistic grazing – cropping system based on soil types within a paddock.

 

Project Description

Salinity, poor soil structure and poor organic matter have been identified as major limiting factors in the paddock to the point where cropping or pasture management have not been highly productive (cropped two years in 10, and unrennovated pasture). The paddock has been used for sheep grazing of winter weeds and native bluebush with minimal intervention. Establishment of Old Man Saltbush (A. nummularia) has had good grazing success in paddocks close by on the property and this trial aims to extend the use of native perennial forage shrubs and annual legume pastures into this paddock in a holistic approach based on soil types.

 

The purpose of the trial is to use EM-38 and soil profile analysis to determine the soil types and constraints across the paddock, and use this information to plant and establish appropriate shrub and legume pasture species which can be grazed in the establishment year and cropped in subsequent years.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 96703110

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00360SA1

Area (Ha): 67.2

 

Project Aim

This trial aims to:

  • Demonstrate how to successfully establish mixed Rhagodia species and other high value, anthelmintic forage shrubs by monitoring plant survival rates in different locations across the Wheatbelt
  • Demonstrate the effects of grazing anthelmintic forage shrubs in sheep by comparing parasitic worm egg counts of animals before and after the animals graze the trial paddock.

Project Description

The extensive ENRICH project identified a number of native plant species that would be appropriate for livestock grazing and may have anthelmintic properties (Emms & Revell 2014). This project will extend the existing knowledge and information by testing the practicalities of establishment and use of a number of Rhagodia and other anthelmintic species to large scale plantings on various soil types, management systems and locations across the Avon Basin Region. The trial will occur on properties in Moorine Rock, Cunderdin and Bencubbin. Species being tested will be Rhagodia preissii pressii, Rhagodia parabolica, Rhagodia drummondii, Enchylaena tomentosa, which will be planted in sandy soils which is the preferred soil type for Rhagodia’s.

 

Reference:

Emms, J., Revell, D. (2011) Perennial forage shrubs provide profitable and sustainable grazing: Key findings from the Enrich project. Future Farms CRC

http://www.futurefarmonline.com.au/publications/other-publications.htm

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder, DAFWA

Contact: Tracey Hobbs

Ph: 96703106

Email: thobbs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00342SA1

Area (Ha): 3.5

 

Project Aim

To evaluate improvements to soil infiltration and productivity by increasing root penetration to subsoil that is impacted by compaction, sodicity or acidity, through incorporating lime, gypsum or organic matter.

 

By incorporating gypsum or chicken manure pellets to stabilize clay soils and addition lime to York Gum soils the benefits of deep ripping should be prolonged.

 

Project Description

With the low growing season rainfall, farmers in the eastern grain belt need to maximise the water and fertilizer use efficiency of their cropping systems.  Soil infiltration needs to be optimized to reduce the risk of runoff and plant root depths need to be maximized to ensuring that the roots can follow nutrients and water down the profile subsoil.

 

The answer is not as simple as tackling one issue rather looking at all of the elements and treating them together.  Treating soil compaction by deep ripping will not achieve long term benefits without addressing other soil constraints like soil acidity or sodicity.

 

Benefits to deep ripping the soils, in terms of increased grain production and improved infiltration behavior, should last longer when the clay soil is stabilized by the addition of gypsum or chicken manure pellets and when the York Gum soil is improved by the addition of lime.

 

The adoption of such improvements is very dependent on their duration; the longer the benefit the more economical and environmentally sustainable the one off cost of the establishment will be and therefore the adoption of the practice.

 

This trial site is co-located with and will add value to the GRDC trial “Minimising the impact of soil compaction on crop yield” project run by DAFWA.  This project linkage will enable greater trial assessment and increased extension potential on how to best manage soil compaction.

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Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Lakes Grower Group

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 96703100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2015                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00345S

Area (Ha): 10.3

 

Project Aim

To evaluate the use of organic carbon based biostimulants on soil health and plant productivity in Western Australian cropping systems.

 

Project Description

The use of organic carbon based biostimulants is not a common practice in WA broadacre farming systems, but has the potential to improve soil structure allowing for better water penetration and increased availability of sol nutrients for crop utilisation and growth.

Blackjak is a concentrated liquid mixture of humic, fulvic and ulmic acids that is suitable for soil and foliar application. Humic acids are natural chelating agents so soil applications help to mobilize macro and micro nutrients. When used in heavy clay soils Blackjak may help break the clay bonds potentially making the soil lighter leading to an increase in microbial activity, air and water circulation and water retention.

Also to be trialed is a combination of a liquid carbon and a liquid soluble lime applied with UAN.  The liquid carbon RCC33 Reactive Carbon Complex holds nutrients (especially high analysis fertilisers) in a loosely charged carbon bond that permits plants to easily access this nutrition, thereby preventing waste and leaching. It also chelates and holds other macro and micro elements to supply a nutrient available and fertile area for root systems, microbes, oxygen and water to interact in a highly productive aerobic environment. The soluble lime contains effective volumes of plant available calcium to remediate soil acidity, salinity and sodicity to improve nutrient availability. CalSap is a liquid calcium that regulates plant nitrogen efficiency, improves phosphate efficiency, helps strengthen cell walls, improves plant risk remediation, improves pasture quality.

The project will test the use of Blackjak @ 2l/ha and combo – CalSap @ 7l/ha and RCC33 @ 14l/ha with liquid N compared to control areas, on soil attributes, crop plant tissue, grain yeild and grain quality.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Land holder, Curtin University & Greening Australia

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 96703110

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014                        End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00344SA1

Area (Ha): 0.7ha

 

Project Aim

To identify and quantify the soil health benefits of stabilising degraded land on established mixed forage perennial shrub sites through comparison of planted and non-planted sites at each location and comparisons of site age between locations. Also attempt to identify the time after planting that soil benefits will be realised and analyse the micro climate in and around shrubs for correlations between soil health, plant cover, and plant diversity.

 

Project Description

Mixed forage shrubs successfully established on farms between 1991 and 2013 will be analysed to determine the impacts of the plantings on soil health, micro climate modification and management options. Measurements will include soil salinity, moisture, temperature, pH, organic carbon, microbial biomass and nutrients; ground cover, plant species composition and estimated feed value. With this information it is anticipated that land owners will be able to better integrate the plantings into their whole farming systems.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Contact: Sally Fenner

Phone: (08) 9938 0125

Email: sally.fenner@nacc.com.au

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: March 2014    End Date: June 2016

Site ID: INNOV-292-01

Size Area Ha: 42 ha  monitored with a  total treatment area of  675 ha

 

AIM:

The aim of this project is to improve soil health in the NAR through demonstrating principles to effectively ameliorate sub soil acidity. These sites will assess different lime rates and incorporation methods relative to each other in an attempt to find the best amelioration technique for different soil type/rainfall zone.

SITE DETAILS:

This site  was set out in two randomised blocks located west of Binnu on yellow sand plain comparing three rates of lime (0, 2 and 6 t/ha) with six incorporation treatments using a Mouldboard plough, Grizzly Deep Digger, Offset disks, one way plough, deep ripper and control plots with no incorporation.

SITE OUTCOMES:

The measurement of site results has not yet occurred so no outcomes are available at this time. A few observations have been made on-ground, the incorporation of lime by the Grizzly Deep Digger was better than expected although some issues were experienced seeding into plots recently treated with the Grizzly Deep Digger or mouldboard plough.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Energy Farmers Australia

Contact: Euan Beamont

Phone: (08) 9965 0259

Email: euan@energyfarmers.com.au

Website: www.energyfarmers.com.au

Supporting Organisation: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: December 2014    End Date: May 2016

Site ID: 1512-05-04

Size Are Ha: 1

 

Project Aim

Many wheat farmers are burning wheat straw harvest rows to control chemical resistant weeds. Considering that wheat straw is quite high in potassium (K) and that K is a nutrient that is often limiting in low K soils, is there potential to process wheat straw through pyrolysis to produce renewable energy and use the by-product (biochar) to return K to soil types low in K. In effect, “mine” potassium from soil types high in K to use in soils low in K.

The trial will explore applications of wheat straw biochar at various rates to low potassium (K) soils to observe plant response in terms of yield, K availability to plants and economic impacts.

The trial will be carried out at Mungala Farm, Mullewa in a soil type typically low in potassium.

Methodology

Small plot trials will consist of a minimum of 3 replications for each treatment and include:

  • Control (No treatment)
  • Standard treatment with a traditional fertiliser
  • 4 x biochar treatments – At this point the analysis of the biochar being used is unavailable so application rates haven’t been set yet however would include something like:
    • Biochar with traditional (low K) fertiliser x 2 rates
    • Biochar only at  2 rates
  • Biochar would be applied with the fertilisers, either under (deep banded) or with the seed.

 

This project is being delivered by Energy Farmers Australia Pty Ltd and is supported by Northern Agricultural Catchments Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Landholder

Contact: Jim Wedge

Phone: (08) 99366366

Email: jimwedge22@gmail.com

Supporting Organisation: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: October 2014    End Date: June 2015

Site ID: 1512-05-01

Size Are Ha: 50

 

Project Aim

This site will demonstrate the establishment of a new perennial pasture stand with the aid of soil wetter, it will also trial two different methods of rejuvenating existing low density stands of perennial grass through the use of knockdown sprays and zero till seeding.

 

Methodology

This demonstration will consist of three treatments all treatments will include the application of soil wetter to boost the water holding capacity of the soil.

Treatment 1: Will take place with no existing perennial species, preparation includes knockdown spray to remove volunteer annual weeds to reduce competition and then seeded using subtropical and temperate grass species using a modified disk seeder. Fertilizer will be applied through an innovative liquid injection system attached to the seeding machine which will be used for all treatments.

Treatment 2: Will take place in an existing perennial stand, site preparation begins with a knockdown spray to subdue existing perennial grasses. The site will be seeded with perennials using a zero till seeder to minimise damage to the existing grasses which is based on pasture cropping technology.

Treatment 3: Will also take place in an existing perennial stand that has been treated with a knockdown spray to subdue existing perennial grasses. The site will then be left to regenerate naturally, the objective of this is to;

  1. Identify if successful regeneration will occur naturally.
  2. To see if the naturally germinated plants survive beyond seedling stage.

 

This project is being delivered by Jim Wedge and is supported by Northern Agricultural Catchments Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Evergreen Farming Inc

Contact: Erin Gorter

Phone: 0429 833 752

Email: erin.gorter@agvivo.com.au

Website: www.evergreen.asn.au

Supporting Organisation: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: November 2014    End Date: May 2016

Site ID: 1512-05-07

Size Are Ha: 3

 

Project Aim

With their very deep roots (>3m), perennial pastures can access nutrients from deep in the soil profile, previously leached past the root zone of shallow rooted annual pasture species. However, the poor sandy soils that perennial pastures are typically grown on have a low nutrient holding capacity. And in most cases, due to low margins and cost cutting, the application of fertiliser in recent years has been sporadic at best. It is highly likely that perennial pastures will respond to additional nutrition, but which nutrients at what rate will give the best bang for buck?

 

Methodology

This project will conduct nutrition trials in 3 perennial pasture paddocks that have a good annual legume content, to determine if the nitrogen requirements of the perennial pastures can be met by the nitrogen fixation of the annual legumes. The nutrient requirements (P,K,S, TE) of the annual legumes will also be determined.

A series of simple nutrient rich test strips will be laid out in paddocks containing a good mix of perennial pastures and annual legumes. The response of the pastures to the addition of the various nutrients will then be determined by regular tissue testing and dry matter cuts. Soil testing (to 1m) will be used to determine the background soil fertility of each site. The effectiveness of nitrogen fixation by the annual legume component will be determined by nodule scoring and possibly laboratory analysis.

This project is being delivered by Evergreen Farming Inc  and is supported by Northern Agricultural Catchments Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Evergreen Farming Inc

Contact: Erin Gorter

Phone: 0429 833 752

Email: erin.gorter@agvivo.com.au

Website: www.evergreen.asn.au

Supporting Organisation: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: November 2014    End Date: May 2016

Site ID: 1512-05-07

Size Are Ha: 3

 

Project Aim

With their very deep roots (>3m), perennial pastures can access nutrients from deep in the soil profile, previously leached past the root zone of shallow rooted annual pasture species. However, the poor sandy soils that perennial pastures are typically grown on have a low nutrient holding capacity. And in most cases, due to low margins and cost cutting, the application of fertiliser in recent years has been sporadic at best. It is highly likely that perennial pastures will respond to additional nutrition, but which nutrients at what rate will give the best bang for buck?

 

Methodology

This project will conduct nutrition trials in 3 perennial pasture paddocks that have a good annual legume content, to determine if the nitrogen requirements of the perennial pastures can be met by the nitrogen fixation of the annual legumes. The nutrient requirements (P,K,S, TE) of the annual legumes will also be determined.

A series of simple nutrient rich test strips will be laid out in paddocks containing a good mix of perennial pastures and annual legumes. The response of the pastures to the addition of the various nutrients will then be determined by regular tissue testing and dry matter cuts. Soil testing (to 1m) will be used to determine the background soil fertility of each site. The effectiveness of nitrogen fixation by the annual legume component will be determined by nodule scoring and possibly laboratory analysis.

This project is being delivered by Evergreen Farming Inc  and is supported by Northern Agricultural Catchments Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Evergreen Farming Inc

Contact: Erin Gorter

Phone: 0429 833 752

Email: erin.gorter@agvivo.com.au

Website: www.evergreen.asn.au

Supporting Organisation: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: November 2014    End Date: May 2016

Site ID: 1512-05-07

Size Are Ha: 3

 

Project Aim

With their very deep roots (>3m), perennial pastures can access nutrients from deep in the soil profile, previously leached past the root zone of shallow rooted annual pasture species. However, the poor sandy soils that perennial pastures are typically grown on have a low nutrient holding capacity. And in most cases, due to low margins and cost cutting, the application of fertiliser in recent years has been sporadic at best. It is highly likely that perennial pastures will respond to additional nutrition, but which nutrients at what rate will give the best bang for buck?

 

Methodology

This project will conduct nutrition trials in 3 perennial pasture paddocks that have a good annual legume content, to determine if the nitrogen requirements of the perennial pastures can be met by the nitrogen fixation of the annual legumes. The nutrient requirements (P,K,S, TE) of the annual legumes will also be determined.

A series of simple nutrient rich test strips will be laid out in paddocks containing a good mix of perennial pastures and annual legumes. The response of the pastures to the addition of the various nutrients will then be determined by regular tissue testing and dry matter cuts. Soil testing (to 1m) will be used to determine the background soil fertility of each site. The effectiveness of nitrogen fixation by the annual legume component will be determined by nodule scoring and possibly laboratory analysis.

This project is being delivered by Evergreen Farming Inc  and is supported by Northern Agricultural Catchments Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Evergreen Farming Inc

Contact: Erin Gorter

Phone: 0429 833 752

Email: erin.gorter@agvivo.com.au

Website: www.evergreen.asn.au

Supporting Organisation: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: November 2014    End Date: May 2016

Site ID: 1512-05-06

Size Are Ha: 80

 

Project Aim

One of the barriers to adoption of perennial pastures is the cost of establishment, typically $150-200 per hectare. Given this high cost, farmers are reluctant to re-sow perennial pastures that either failed to establish initially due to poor seasonal conditions or have thinned out over time due to overgrazing.

This project will demonstrate an innovative method to improve the productivity of perennial pasture stands with sub-optimal density.

 

Methodology

Three (3) low density perennial pasture stands will be manipulated with herbicide in 2014 to kill the annual component of the pasture (a mix of grass and broadleaf weeds). This will allow new perennial pasture seedlings to germinate and establish without competition from annual weeds. These new perennial pasture seedlings will germinate from seed set by the existing low density perennial pasture over previous years. Over the last 5 to 10 years a number of farmers and researchers have observed new perennial pasture seedlings germinating from previous seed set, but no one has ever tried to use this process strategically to thicken up a thin stand.

A series of monitoring sites will be established within each paddock to monitor perennial pasture density over time. Plant counts and photo monitoring will take place every 2 months over the first summer (while the paddock is de-stocked) and thereafter every 6 months until the project winds up in May 2016.

 

This project is being delivered by Evergreen Farming Inc  and is supported by Northern Agricultural Catchments Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Evergreen Farming Inc

Contact: Erin Gorter

Phone: 0429 833 752

Email: erin.gorter@agvivo.com.au

Website: www.evergreen.asn.au

Supporting Organisation: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: November 2014    End Date: May 2016

Site ID: 1512-05-06

Size Are Ha: 80

 

Project Aim

One of the barriers to adoption of perennial pastures is the cost of establishment, typically $150-200 per hectare. Given this high cost, farmers are reluctant to re-sow perennial pastures that either failed to establish initially due to poor seasonal conditions or have thinned out over time due to overgrazing.

This project will demonstrate an innovative method to improve the productivity of perennial pasture stands with sub-optimal density.

 

Methodology

Three (3) low density perennial pasture stands will be manipulated with herbicide in 2014 to kill the annual component of the pasture (a mix of grass and broadleaf weeds). This will allow new perennial pasture seedlings to germinate and establish without competition from annual weeds. These new perennial pasture seedlings will germinate from seed set by the existing low density perennial pasture over previous years. Over the last 5 to 10 years a number of farmers and researchers have observed new perennial pasture seedlings germinating from previous seed set, but no one has ever tried to use this process strategically to thicken up a thin stand.

A series of monitoring sites will be established within each paddock to monitor perennial pasture density over time. Plant counts and photo monitoring will take place every 2 months over the first summer (while the paddock is de-stocked) and thereafter every 6 months until the project winds up in May 2016.

 

This project is being delivered by Evergreen Farming Inc  and is supported by Northern Agricultural Catchments Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: West Midlands Group

Contact: Anne Wilkins

Phone: (08) 9651 4008

Email: anne@wmgroup.org.au

Website: www.wmgroup.org.au

Supporting Organisation: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: December 2014    End Date: June 2016

Site ID: 1512-05-03

Size Are Ha: 10

 

Project Aim

The aim is to develop and test new approaches for incorporating lime into acidic subsoils for both non-wetting sandplain and gravelly soils.  It is expected that the incorporation of lime will help address non-wetting soil by inverting the topsoil while lifting subsoil seams to the surface.

The objective is to give growers a robust, reliable and cost effective system of inverting soils and achieving lime incorporation into acidic subsoils in a broadacre context. It is intended that the system is flexible so that it can be modified for different soil types and different situations across the State.

Methodology

This involves modification of a one-way discs (Chamberlain plough) in order to increase the inversion of the soil to a depth of at least 30cm (12 inches) for sandy soils and 25cm (10 inches) for gravel soils effectively incorporating surface applied lime into the subsoil.

The concept is to remove every second disc from the plough to allow for depth and trash control. A range of different sized discs are being trialled including 25 inch, 30 inch and 35 inch discs on the plough.  The implement is 5 metres wide, double the width of some mouldboard ploughs, allowing for greater speed and efficiency. This system reduces soil trenches and ridges compared to mouldboard ploughing. To minimise soil erosion the trial site is being seeded with a cover crop.

 

This project is being delivered by West Midlands Group and is supported by Northern Agricultural Catchments Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: West Midlands Group

Contact: Anne Wilkins

Phone: (08) 9651 4008

Email: anne@wmgroup.org.au

Website: www.wmgroup.org.au

Supporting Organisation: Northern Agricultural Catchments Council

Website: www.nacc.com.au

Start Date: November 2014 End Date: June 2016

Site ID: 1512-05-02

Size Are Ha: 1

 

Project Aim

This site presents a unique opportunity to answer some long term, soil fertility questions resulting from the development of sandy soils in the Northern Agricultural Region that have arisen with the rediscovery of a trial, 80Ba6, which was laid down in 1980 at Badgingarra. This trial is now showing residual effects, nearly 30 years after it was last assessed.

The questions this site addresses are: Does the blue lupin revolution for building soil fertility on Midlands light soils (fostered by Sir Eric Smart in the 1950s) have consequences and provide insights to current soil management questions? Are there implications for soil acidification? What are the potential soil carbon fertility improvements under long term regenerating lupins? Does a long term lupin history accelerate soil non-wetting properties? How does the fertiliser history interact with soil acidification and conservation of the soil resource?

Methodology

In the first year, a comprehensive review of all existing results from the early 1980s is being undertaken. The site treatment plan will be confirmed and treatment areas pegged out.
Selected treatment profiles will be soil sampled and characterised to determine differences in soil fertility related to the major treatment differences. Assessments include general soil fertility measures such as soil pH and aluminium levels, exchangeable cations and Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC), P leaching, carbon sequestration, and soil wettability. An innovative drone system (Riethmuller, DAFWA, Merredin) for taking detailed aerial shots of the plots from close range is being used in both years

In the second year the site will be cropped to give a bioassay of the soil fertility levels. The original plots will be crossed with plus/minus P and nitrogen (N) fertiliser treatments to measure the response to these nutrients at their different soil levels resulting from the original treatments.

 

This project is being delivered by West Midlands Group and is supported by Northern Agricultural Catchments Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Guy Boggs

Ph: 9670 3112

Email: gboggs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014                        End Date: 2017

Area (Ha): 67

 

Project Aim

The aim of this project is to study the movement of the applied lime though the soil profile and to identify any potential subsoil constraints.

 

Project Description

This trial will investigate the fate of 2.5t of lime applied in early 2014 to a poor-performing paddock to ameliorate the top soil pH, which was around 4.2-4.5. This lime input should address the top soil acidity but there may be other potential subsoil constraints (possible subsoil acidity or aluminium toxicity) affecting the soil performance. This trial will investigate these issues using EM38 and soil testing to depth. This will also indicate if and how the top dressed lime is moving through the profile.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Guy Boggs

Ph: 96703112

Email: mailto:gboggs@wheatbeltnnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014                         End Date: 2017

 Area (Ha): 178

 

Project Aim

The aim of this demonstration site is to assess the impact of incorporating mulch from existing oil mallee belts in the alleys between the belts and determine if it  increases the soil carbon content and improves the soil biology.

 

Project Description

Existing oil mallee belts will be harvested and mulched in a one pass operation and then spread on the cropped area between the belts providing a source of carbon/organic matter. The cropped alley will also have a microbial based compost tea sprayed onto it with the aim that this will inoculate the oil mallee mulch with active microbes which may not currently exist in the cropped paddock due to conventional cropping practices. Click here for more information on carbon farming.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Tracey Hobbs

Ph: 96703106

Email: thobbs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00043SA2

Area (Ha): 280

 

Project Aim

The goal of this project is to compare two farm management systems within the valley floor (with and without sheep) and their effects on the soil.

 

Project Description

This trial will compare two paddocks that have up until now been managed in the same way. The trial is located in a heavy clay valley floor where the paddocks have seen a cropping/grazing (sheep) management system. The property is starting to move towards controlled traffic farming so the landholder wants to investigate the impacts that sheep have on the soil in this system, as well as if there are any other possible constraints happening at depth across these paddocks.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Intensive soil testing to depth following liming
November 132014

Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Guy Boggs

Ph: 9670 3112

Email: gboggs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2016

 Area (Ha): 33,000 ha

 

Project Aim

The goal of this project is to fully  assess the extent of subsoil constraints across the cropping system.

 

Project Description

This trial will undertake  a comprehensive soil testing program across the whole cropping system down to 30cm, evaluating mid and subsoil characteristics. It is expected that it will take four years to monitor the soil  to fully evaluate the extent of subsoil constraints across the 33,000ha cropping program. Preliminary indications have been that subsoil acidity is a limiting factor to productivity and an outcome of this investment is to make more informed input decisions to improve productivity, profitability and soil health.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Tracey Hobbs

Ph: 96703106

Email: thobbs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2016

Site ID: SA00038SA2

Area (Ha):52

 

Project Aim

This trial aims to analyse the impact of applying cattle feedlot solid waste (manure) to the cropping system.

 

Project Description

Each year the beef cattle feedlot produces large amounts of manure waste, a resource which they wish to utilize as a source of nutrient supply for crops and pastures on the farm.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Liebe Group

Contact: Tracey Hobbs

Ph: 96703106

Email: thobbs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2016

Site ID: SA00030SA2

Area (Ha): TBC

 

Project Aim

The primary aim of this trial is to investigate which soil renovation technique proves to help the most with water conservation.

 

Project Description

Through the use of a soil moisture probe this project will explore the potential role of biotechnology in helping Western Australian cropping and pastoral industries meet the challenges of climate change and help farmers adapt their farm management systems to meet the predicted impacts of climate change.  The data from the moisture probes will be used to inform growers about which amelioration techniques to utilise for moisture retention.

The project will demonstrate the differences in soil amelioration practices and monitor the impact these have on:

  • water holding capacity;
  • water infiltration.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Guy Boggs

Ph: 9670 3112

Email:mailto:gboggs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Start Date: 2014                        End Date: 2015

Area (Ha): 62

 

Project Aim

The goal of this project is to gain knowledge of how to use soil type information to inform variable lime applications across a paddock.

 

Project Description

This trial will carry out soil tests across the paddock at different depths to:

  • learn how the applied lime has been incorporated through the soil profile;
  • understand the different soil types present in the paddock in order to manage the lime application more efficiently.

The trial will be carried out on a paddock that has had lime applied and incorporated using a mouldboard plough. The soil testing will also be used to examine whether the mouldboard ploughing has increased the incorporation of lime through the soil profile.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Urban waste compost demonstration
November 132014

Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Duli Group (with support from NutraRich)

Contact: Fiona Brayshaw

Ph: 96703100

Email: fbrayshaw@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

 Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014                       End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00021SA1

Area (Ha): Three sites (10.6 ha, 12.7 ha, 11.8 ha)

Project Aim

The aim of this demonstration is to test the potential soil and crop benefits and practicality of applying compost produced by NutraRich which is sourced from waste supplied by the South Metropolitan Regional Council refuse facility in Perth.

Project Description

Most WA soils are low in organic matter and nutrients and have low nutrient retention capacity. Crop and pasture production has traditionally relied on regular application of chemical fertilisers to supply nutrients but they do not replenish organic matter.  Presence of soil organic matter improves water-use efficiency, nutrient retention and supply, which are elements important for overall soil fertility and health.

The use of composted refuse products as a soil ameliorant in Wheatbelt farming systems of the Avon River Basin could potentially provide a number of benefits including:
1. Assist in the amelioration of soil constraints.
2. Provide nutrients and carbon for broadacre agriculture, enhancing fertiliser use and crop resilience
3. Support the development of markets for the use of composted refuse products.

The use of compost on broad-acre farms in WA is limited by transport costs, therefore this demonstration will use a moderate quality compost to reduce costs. If the benefits are found to outweigh the costs then the product will be worth considering for broad-acre farms.

This demonstration will monitor soil moisture holding capacity, pH, soil biology and cation exchange capacity aswell as crop yield and grain quality on three farm sites in Cadoux that have had compost applied @ 2.5t/ha, 5t/ha and 10t/ha

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Living Farm

Contact: Tracey Hobbs

Ph: 96703106

Email: thobbs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au 

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2016

Site ID: SA00020SA1

Area (Ha): 0.1

 

Project Aim

This project will trial whether chicken manure (with or without additives) can be used as a nitrogen source for growing broadacre grain crops, substituting traditional inorganic fertiliser.

 

Project Description

Cropping farmers are increasingly looking towards cheap, alternative, more organic fertiliser options. A good opportunity for them is to utilise the waste associated with poultry farming (including chicken manure and the bedding material derived from waste forest products and thinnings).

The primary outcome of this trial is to show that chicken manure (with or without additives) can be used as a nitrogen source for growing broadacre grain crops (substituted for traditional inorganic fertiliser). A secondary outcome will be to assess the effect or otherwise of combining Biochar produced from forestry thinnings with the manure.

Outside of the direct benefits of its use as fertiliser for the Avon Valley Basin there are three major outcomes:

  • it will act as a market for currently non-utilised forestry products and thinnings;
  • it will assist in the disposal of chicken manure and bedding;
  • it will return some of these nutrients and carbon back into the regions where they were originally sourced from.

 

Project Outputs

In this trial:
 There was no effect on plant establishment between any of the treatments
 Crop vigour was increased through the application of Phosphorus and Potassium (P + K) Starter fertilizer. With Manure based treatments showing equivalent vigour to the Sulphate of Ammonia (SOA).
 Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) reflectance was increased through the application of P + K Starter fertilizer, with no significant difference between treatments applied before or after sowing.
 Crop yield results reflected vigour and NDVI data.
 All treatments containing P + K Starter were significantly higher yielding than treatments containing no starter and the untreated control.
 Manure and Manure/Char/Urea treatments showed equivalent yield results to SOA treatments.
 Significant differences in protein concentrations were identified between the treatments. These differences appear to be related to yield- with the higher yielding plots showing lower protein levels

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Guy Boggs

Ph: 9670 3112

Email: mailto:gboggs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2016

Area (Ha): 227

 

Project Aim

The aim of this project is to compare the effects of growing lupins as cash crop versus growing lupins for brown manuring.  The process of brown manuring may contribute to the overall soil carbon storage, improve soil nutrition and remove weed seeds.

 

Project Description

This demonstration will illustrate three systems:

  • brown manuring of lupins;
  • district practice of growing lupins for harvest;
  • fallow treatment (including spray topping prior to seed set).

The brown manuring of lupins will also provide a site for demonstrating a practice that has the capability of improving soil carbon storage and may be considered as part of a carbon farming system (see the Green and Brown Manuring Carbon Farming Fact Sheet for further information)

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Moving towards microbial based agriculture
November 132014

Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Guy Boggs

Ph: 9670 3112

Email: gboggs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014                         End Date: 2016

 

Area (Ha): 18

 

Project Aim

The aim of this trial is to assess how the application of alternative fertilisers, compost and microbial compost tea, affect the growth and yield potential of a cereal crop.

 

Project Description

Farmers are becoming increasingly more aware of the importance of soil biology and how composts and teas can influence the health of their soils and crops. This site will trial the incorporation of compost and home brewed compost tea in the cropping program as an alternative use of conventional fertilisers and monitor the effects.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Guy Boggs

Ph: 9670 3112

Email: mailto:gboggs@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2015

Area (Ha): 186

 

Project Aim

The goal of this project is to study how previously applied lime is moving through the soil profile and identify any potential soil constraints.

 

Project Description

This trial will be undertaken on a site that is highly variable, with pH varying considerably across the paddock. The site has had pH ameliorants applied over 2013 and 2014.  This trial will carry out sampling of the soil profiles to depth across the paddock to evaluate the effects of the ameliorant through the soil and to identify any other potential subsurface constraints.  The paddock will also be Electromagnetic (EM) surveyed to determine if there are any other soil constraints present and develop an understanding of the spatial variation in soil properties across the paddock and their effect on lime movement through the soil profile.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00014SA1

Area (Ha): 10

 

Project Aim

This project aims to demonstrate that forage shrubs can be incorporated into a sandalwood plantation design to achieve a multi-function agroforestry system for both sandalwood growth and grazing.

 

Project Description

A 10ha site will be established to trial the incorporation of forage shrubs, which have been focal species in the CSIRO ENRICH project, into a biodiverse direct seeded sandalwood plantation. The site will consist of a broad selection of legume and non legume hosts that will be cultivated to achieve both forage and sandalwood production objectives.

The trial aims to demonstrate:

  • forage shrubs can be incorporated in a productive sandalwood plantation;
  • the ability to use the forage shrubs within the plantation as part of the whole farm grazing system;
  • the effects of utilising the forage on the production of sandalwood.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID:  SA00314_BA

Area (Ha): 3

 

Project Aim

This project aims to implement agroforestry systems in a manner that encourages wildlife while maintaining production values.

 

Project Description

This site will look at using a biodiverse brushwood planting to buffer remnant vegetation within the landscape whilst retaining its production value. Brushwood plantation usually lack structural diversity so this plantation will have other species included to improve this and encourage biodiversity within the plantation.

 

Project Outputs

The biodiversity value of this site will be monitored at establishment in 2014 and again in 2017.

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00025_BA

Area (Ha): 5

 

Project Aim

This project aims to implement agroforestry systems in a manner that encourages wildlife while maintaining production values.

 

Project Description

This site will look at using both a biodiverse sandalwood system and a biodiverse forage shrub system to create a wildlife corridor to connect remnant vegetation across the landscape. The production values of the wildlife corridor will be in the sandalwood and the forage available for stock.

 

Project Outputs

The biodiversity value of this site will be monitored at establishment in 2014 and again in 2017.

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Avongro Inc.

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00017SA1

Area (Ha): 2

 

Project Aim

This project is looking at the growth rates of Casuarina obesa with and without the presence of Frankia. It is also comparing this against 5 different provinences of C. obesa.

 

Project Description

The primary objective of this trial is to compare growth rates of Casaurina obesa with and without Frankia bacteria. The secondary outcome will be to assess C. obesa as a viable commercial timber product. This could serve as a multiple land use enterprise for landholders to value add on low production, saline affected land.

In addition to beneficial growth condition, the trial will also have the following outcomes:

  • determine the effectiveness of Frankia at providing nitrogen to the saline soil;
  • promote commercial tree crop enterprise on otherwise low value farmland if successful;
  • set up demonstration sites of silviculture management to improve landholder knowledge in on-farm forestry.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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 Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00016SA1

Area (Ha): 0.4

 

Project Aim

This project aims to demonstrate how to successfully establish a low input native grass grazing system within an agroforestry plantation.

 

Project Description

Native grasses will be planted along the eastern boundary of an existing sandalwood plantation to allow for seed dispersal with the dominant easterly wind. This trial will attempt to create a self-sustaining grazing system within a sandalwood production system.

 

Trial success will be monitored by:

  • tracking the seed dispersal of planted species across the plantation;
  • the palatability of the species planted using sheep activity within the trial area;
  • the ability of the grasses to recover after grazing.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

Biomass cuts done in September 2016, after 1 year of grass growth, to simulate grazing by livestock.

Before cutting

Biomass cuts - before

After cutting

Biomass cuts - after

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00028_BA

Area (Ha): 10

 

Project Aim

This project aims to implement a forage shrub grazing system in a manner that encourages wildlife while maintaining production values.

 

Project Description

This site will look at using a biodiverse forage species mix to create a wildlife corridor within the landscape as well as providing valuable grazing benefits for the farming system.  Forage species are the main species planted but other taller species have been include to offer strata diversity to the planting.

 

Project Outputs

The biodiversity value of this site will be monitored at establishment in 2014 and again in 2017.

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00299_BA

Area (Ha): 11

 

Project Aim

This project aims to implement a Casuarina obesa timber plantation in a manner that encourages wildlife usage while maintaining production values.

 

Project Description

This site will look at using a Casuarina obesa timber plantation to create a wildlife corridor within the landscape. While Cas. obesa, a native tree species in the Wheatbelt, is the primary species planted other species have been added to give strata diversity to encourage local biodiversity into the plantation.

 

Project Outputs

The biodiversity value of this site will be monitored at establishment in 2014 and again in 2017.

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00027_BA

Area (Ha): 26

 

Project Aim

This project aims to implement an oil mallee agroforestry systems in a manner that encourages wildlife while maintaining production values.

 

Project Description

This site will look at using oil mallees to buffer remnant vegetation and create a wildlife corridor to connect remnant vegetation across the landscape while remaining a viable agroforestry planting. Other species have been added to the planting to encourage biodiversity within the plantation.

 

Project Outputs

The biodiversity value of this site will be monitored at establishment in 2014 and again in 2017.

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Mount Marshall Sandalwood Network

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2016

Site ID: SA000035_CF

Area (Ha): 6

 

Project Aim

To demonstrate the carbon sequestration potential of sandalwood systems in the eastern Wheatbelt.

 

Project Description

There is the potential in the eastern wheatbelt to use unproductive cropping land to create a dual purpose system to sequest carbon and produce a successful agroforestry plantation. This site will be direct seeded with a diverse mix of sandalwood and host species, using new machinery engineered by local farmers which will reduce the cost of implementing this system.

 

Project Outputs

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Wheatbelt NRM, Individual Landholder

Contact: Jo Wheeler

Ph: 96703121

Email: jwheeler@wheatbeltnrm.org.au

Website: Wheatbelt NRM Website

Start Date: 2014             End Date: 2017

Site ID: SA00313_ BA

Area (Ha): 20

 

Project Aim

This project aims to implement sandalwood agroforestry systems in a manner that encourages wildlife while maintaining production values.

 

Project Description

This site will look at using a sandalwood plantation to create a wildlife corridor within the landscape whilst maintaining its production value. The sandalwood host mix is a biodiverse mix that includes other non-host species to increase the structural diversity with the plantation.

 

Project Outputs

The biodiversity value of this site will be monitored at establishment in 2014 and again in 2017.

Project outputs will be added once the trial has been completed.

 

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Project Details

Project delivered by: De Grey LCDC

Contact name: Mary-Anne Clunies- Ross

Email: maryannec@rangelandswa.com.au

Start Date: April 2014

End Date: December 2014

Site Location: Three sites in the mid – upper De Grey river catchment

 

Project Description

Three members of the DeGrey LCDC have set up their own demonstrations of Rangelands Rehydration works. This builds on the Rangelands NRM sponsored field days with Peter Andrews in 2012. A Catchment Function Analysis of the sub catchment has been carried out at each site, to map how the catchment should function and where natural water flows have been disrupted or compromised. Based on this, on ground works such as ponding banks, eco-rolls, brush fences etc. will be designed and targeted to restore natural water functions by slowing and spreading water at critical parts of the sub catchment. This will result in the rehydration and regeneration of natural flood plains.

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Project Details

Project Delivery by: Upper Gascoyne LCDC

Contact name: Jason Hastie

Email: pingandyhs@gmail.com

Start Date: March 2014

End Date: June 2015

Site Location: A number of sites in the Upper Gascoyne and Lyons River catchments, between Gascoyne Junction and Mt. Augustus

 

Project Description

Small erosion nicks in the rangelands landscape can quickly form into head cuts or large erosion gullies that drain water and affect the land’s biodiversity and productivity. The numerous small erosion nicks and gullies encountered on a station need to be dealt with quickly to stop them from growing. A potential solution is the use of coir logs. Coir logs are made from coconut fibres, formed into logs. They are flexible, so will conform to uneven ground and can be easily secured in place with stakes. A quantity of Coir Log has been purchased and supplied to a number of stations in the region. Over the course of several weeks, these logs have been installed and photos taken of the installation. After rain events, monitoring photos and notes will be taken.

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Project delivery by: Rangelands NRM

Contact name: Grey Mackay

Email: greym@rangelandswa.com.au

Start date: March 2014

End Date: March 2016

Site location: Various sites in the Central and Northern Kimberleys

 

Project Description

This project aims to understand cattle behavior in relation to prescribed burning of tropical savannah grassland pastures. Through improved understanding of how cattle interact with the environment, in particular how they utilize burnt versus unburnt areas, this project aims to encourage the adoption of more sustainable grazing practices which maximize productivity and minimize negative environmental impacts (e.g. catastrophic wildfire and erosion). The objective is to demonstrate to pastoralists that appropriate fire management processes have a positive impact on cattle production, thereby encouraging take up of design and implementation of fire management plans.

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Project delivery by: Rangelands NRM

Contact name: John Silver

Email: johns@rangelandswa.com.au

Start date: March 2014

End date: March 2016

Site location: This is one of a number of sites for this project in the rangelands of WA. This site is located in the De Grey River delta, NE of Port Hedland

Project Description

This project aims to test and promote new low-cost techniques for the management of grazing pressure in the rangelands. Current uneven grazing pressure leads to patch grazing – areas of overgrazing and low ground-cover mixed with under-grazing and high ground-cover within the same paddock. This project will apply nutritional shepherding to manage movement and grazing behavior within large paddocks. Nutritional shepherding provides nutritional rewards (eg licks, supplements) in a coordinated arrangement around the landscape. These rewards will be linked with sensory cues (eg remote audio signals and visual guides) to induce long-term behavioral change. The outcomes will be increased ground-cover and livestock productivity in the rangelands.

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Project Details

Project delivery by: Rangelands NRM

Contact name: John Silver

Email: johns@rangelandswa.com.au

Start date: March 2014

End date: March 2016

Site location: This is one of a number of sites for this project in the rangelands of WA. This site is located on the Dampier Peninsula, N of Broome.

Project Description

This project aims to test and promote new low-cost techniques for the management of grazing pressure in the rangelands. Current uneven grazing pressure leads to patch grazing – areas of overgrazing and low ground-cover mixed with under-grazing and high ground-cover within the same paddock. This project will apply nutritional shepherding to manage movement and grazing behavior within large paddocks. Nutritional shepherding provides nutritional rewards (eg licks, supplements) in a coordinated arrangement around the landscape. These rewards will be linked with sensory cues (eg remote audio signals and visual guides) to induce long-term behavioral change. The outcomes will be increased ground-cover and livestock productivity in the rangelands.

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Project Details

Project delivery by: Rangelands NRM

Contact name: John Silver

Email: johns@rangelandswa.com.au

Start date: March 2014

End date: March 2016

Site location: This is one of a number of sites for this project in the rangelands of WA. This site is located in the Wooramel River catchment, inland of Shark Bay

Project Description

This project aims to test and promote new low-cost techniques for the management of grazing pressure in the rangelands. Current uneven grazing pressure leads to patch grazing – areas of overgrazing and low ground-cover mixed with under-grazing and high ground-cover within the same paddock. This project will apply nutritional shepherding to manage movement and grazing behavior within large paddocks. Nutritional shepherding provides nutritional rewards (eg licks, supplements) in a coordinated arrangement around the landscape. These rewards will be linked with sensory cues (eg remote audio signals and visual guides) to induce long-term behavioral change. The outcomes will be increased ground-cover and livestock productivity in the rangelands.

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Reducing soil erosion and managing marginal soils in the Ravensthorpe area
September 242014

Project Details

Project Delivery: Ravensthorpe Agricultural Initiative Network

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  October 2013                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Various sites in the Ravensthorpe shire

Site ID: C210

Project Aim:

The project facilitates sustainable practices in targeted locations in the Ravensthorpe region in the key soil health areas of soil erosion and management of marginal soils.  This will be achieved with the establishment of a series of demonstration sites to show erosion control on erodible and marginal soils sown to native salt tolerant perennial fodders.

 

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Fitzgerald Biosphere Group

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  June 2014                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Gairdner, Western Australia

Site ID: C222c2

Project Aim:

This trial is one of two set up to compare four approaches to nutrient management in order to optimise grower returns in nutrient depleted and acidic soils.  The project aims to provide independent and impartial results of trialing information on four nutrient systems (farmer practice, Col Bowey, HiTech and CSBP) and identify a nutrient system that improves soil health in nutrient depleted soils with no yield penalty – to identify a nutrient system that is cost effective, accessible and sustainable.  The project crosses two rainfall zones and both sites’ soil types are representative across the Jerramungup Shire

The four nutrient management approaches are compared in a randomised block design of three replicates.  Measurements such as root to shoot ratios, crop yield, soil chemical analysis and monitoring of organic soil carbon levels will be taken, along with chemical herbicide residue measurements and soil biological assays.  For 2014 the Gairdner site is sown to wheat.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Fitzgerald Biosphere Group

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  June 2014                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Jerramungup, Western Australia

Site ID: C222c1

Project Aim:

This trial is one of two set up to compare four approaches to nutrient management in order to optimise grower returns in nutrient depleted and acidic soils.  The project aims to provide independent and impartial results of trialing information on four nutrient systems (farmer practice, Col Bowey, HiTech and CSBP) and identify a nutrient system that improves soil health in nutrient depleted soils with no yield penalty – to identify a nutrient system that is cost effective, accessible and sustainable.  The project crosses two rainfall zones and both sites’ soil types are representative across the Jerramungup Shire.

The four nutrient management approaches are compared in a randomised block design of three replicates.  Measurements such as root to shoot ratios, crop yield, soil chemical analysis and monitoring of organic soil carbon levels will be taken, along with chemical herbicide residue measurements and soil biological assays.  For 2014 the Jerramungup site is sown to field peas.

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Project Delivery: Fitzgerald Biosphere Group

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  June 2014                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Various sites in the Jerramungup shire

Site ID: C205

Project Aim:

A large proportion of soils in the region are highly susceptible to wind erosion.  An increase in no-till practices in the last decade has helped to control this problem, but some farmers require support to protect highly erodible sandy soils in targeted areas where a lack of management would impact on key biodiversity assets.  Improving sustainable land practices and reducing erosion events through restricting stock access and establishing vegetation, will have a positive impact on productivity and the health of catchments.

The project  facilitates practice change for erosion control in priority areas in the largely cleared catchments draining in to the Fitzgerald River National Park through fencing to exclude stock and protect remnant vegetation, re vegetation, shelter belts and the establishment of native fodders on marginal and erodible soils.

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Managing sandy blow-outs and non-wetting soils through claying
September 242014

Project Details

Project Delivery: North Stirlings Pallinup Natural Resources

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  October 2013                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Borden, Western Australia

Site ID: C208

Project Aim:

The project aims to establish a series of demonstration sites to show amelioration techniques to avoid or correct soil erosion on sandy blow-out soils, including the use of claying.  Several sites will be soil sampled and analysis done to determine what some of the causes of these sandy blow-outs might be, and appropriate amelioration and management strategies will then be applied and groundcover and plant growth will be monitored.

The project will also be maintaining and collecting measurements from a previously established soil acidity trial to encourage extension of the demonstrated management practices to other landholders in the area.

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Improving soil biology in the Torbay Catchment
September 242014

Project Details

Project Delivery: Torbay Catchment Group

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  October 2013                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Three sites around the Torbay catchment area

Site ID: C211

Project Aim:

The project aims to improve soil health through improved soil biology and nutrient matching strategies.  Three trial sites have been established in the Torbay area to test a range of commercially beneficial soil microbes and assess their ability to increase organic soil carbon, water holding capacity and increase nutrient availability in soil where pasture is grown.  It is hoped that improved soil biology will lead to improved pasture growth and will reduce the need for increased fertiliser applications, this in turn will aid in reducing nutrient leaching in to the Torbay Inlet.

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Managing nutrient addition in the Wilson Inlet Catchment
September 242014

Project Details

Project Delivery: Wilson Inlet Catchment Committee

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  October 2013                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Mt Barker, Western Australia

Site ID: C212 and C222h

Project Aim:

The project aims to compare nutrient addition to a hayliage crop using commercially available organic fertilisers on different soil types and at different rates.  It is hoped that similar production levels can be achieved with organic compared to chemical fertiliser products to manage nutrient addition and reduce nutrient leaching and run-off to creeks and rivers and the Wilson Inlet.

An additional treatment comparing the use of a slow release chemical fertiliser has also been added, to investigate the effect it will have on plant production, soil biology and nutrient leaching.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Stirlings to Coast Farmers

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  June 2014                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Tenterden, Western Australia

Site ID: C222e

Project Aim:

This trial is investigating different methods of lime incorporation (banding, injection, spading or deep ripping, soil inversion techniques) and their effect on soil pH response – time and magnitude.  Crop growth will also be measured.  The first year will include spreading lime at different rates across the trial and establishing a base line data set of pH and soil attributes, with the different incorporation treatments being applied in early 2015.

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Economic and scientific assessment of direct soil survey for soil acidity management
September 242014

Project Details

Project Delivery: Precision SoilTech

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  June 2014                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: various sites from the Stirling Ranges to South Coast area, Western Australia

Site ID: C222d

Project Aim:

This project will evaluate soil sampling density requirements for the production of accurate but cost effective variable rate technology (VRT) maps for soil acidity and nutrient status.  This will then enable affordable zone management of lime application on-farm.  The project involves intensive soil sampling across a range of paddocks south from the Stirling Ranges to the south coast.  Different sampling densities will be analysed for useful accuracy against the cost of more intensive sampling so that an ideal (accurate but still affordable) sampling density can be determined.  VRT maps for sampled paddocks will be produced for the landholders involved in the project, and appropriate lime rates and strategies can then be devised to improve the management of soil acidity on-farm.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: Centre for Excellence in Natural Resource Management

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  June 2014               End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Mettler, Western Australia

Site ID: C222b

Project Aim:

Two demonstration plots, one 20 year second rotation bluegum plantation and one 10 year single rotation bluegum plantation, both recently transition back to pasture in 2014, will be set up with different pasture and fertiliser treatments on a farm in the Mettler area.  The trials will measure a range of soil chemical, physical and biological characteristics and pasture production, and will also be compared with soil measurements from adjacent pasture that has been cleared for agriculture between 35 – 50 years ago and  an adjacent remnant bushland that has not been cleared for agriculture.  This project forms part of a Masters study through CENRM and UWA with the aim to provide baseline data on the impact of bluegum plantations on soil health, and the merits of various strategies to return the land to productive agriculture.

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Project Delivery: South East Premium Wheatgrowers Association

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  June 2014             End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Various locations across the Esperance shire, Western Australia

Site ID: C222f

Project Aim:

A number of growers in the Esperance region will be guided through spatial definition of soils to create a variable rate (VR) lime strategy for their paddocks.  The project will utilise proven precision agriculture (PA) methodology developed in the northern wheatbelt combined with long term NRM objectives to help farmers make informed decisions on precise lime requirements.  Targeting lime to those areas that really require it, with appropriate rates, should prove cost effective for farmers and aid them in improving the health of their soil resource, and boost their productivity.

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Project Details

Project Delivery: South East Premium Wheatgrowers Association

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  June 2014                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Esperance shire, Western Australia

Site ID: C222g

Project Aim:

This project aims to investigate the bluegum to crop/pasture conversion process via a number of case studies of local farmers in the Esperance region who have embarked on the conversion process.  The project will capture the experiences of early adopting farmers in the Esperance shire to better understand the implications of the land use conversion.  A focus will be on the soil monitoring of 3 sites which will create base line data for long term NRM resource condition monitoring, with particular attention payed to maintaining ground cover throughout the conversion process to reduce the risk of soil erosion.

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Managing non-wetting soils in the Cranbrook area
September 242014

Project Details

Project Delivery: Gillamii Centre

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  October 2013                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Tunney, Western Australia

Site ID: C206a

Project Aim:

This trial is one of two that have been set up to examine a range of management options for non-wetting soils, including banded wetters, claying and soil inversion techniques.  This site is established on a forest gravel soil.  The trial is a replicated randomised block design with 3 replicates of each treatment.  The aim is to determine the most effective approach of addressing non-wetting soils to enhance crop growth, carbon sequestration and reduce run-off.  In subsequent years, paddock scale strip trials will demonstrate the most effective treatments from the small scale trial to landholders.

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Managing non-wetting soils in the Cranbrook area
September 242014

Project Details

Project Delivery: Gillamii Centre

Contact: Kathi McDonald or Penni Hewett

Email: kathim@southcoastnrm.com.au or pennih@southcoastnrm.com.au

Website:  South Coast NRM Land theme

Start Date:  October 2013                End Date:  June 2015

Site Location: Cranbrook

Site ID: C206b

Project Aim:

This trial is one of two that have been set up to examine a range of management options for non-wetting soils, including banded wetters, claying and soil inversion techniques.  This site is established on a sandy soil.  The trial is a replicated randomised block design with 3 replicates of each treatment.  The aim is to determine the most effective approach of addressing non-wetting soils to enhance crop growth, carbon sequestration and reduce run-off.  In subsequent years, paddock scale strip trials will demonstrate the most effective treatments from the small scale trial to landholders.

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September 42014

Agtrialsites is a cross regional NRM WA initiative that aims to provide information on sustainable agriculture projects across Western Australia.

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Manure on Salt Paddocks

Manure on Salt Paddocks

Katanning, Western Australia

September 12014

Does the application of cow manure improve the amount of cover, the quantity of the feed and overall productivity of otherwise marginal land.

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Alternative Fertiliser Treatments

Alternative Fertiliser Treatments

Darkan, Western Australia

August 282014

This trial will independently test the products of two alternative fertilisers, measure the soil and crop responses (if any), investigate whether the addition of microbes has any tangible difference and begin to gain an understanding of how these products work.

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Stubble Retention

Stubble Retention

Mayanup, Western Australia

August 282014

Demonstrating soil health benefits of promoting stubble breakdown using stubble crunching and fish emulsion compared to burning.

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Enrich Mixed Forage System

Enrich Mixed Forage System

Pingelly, Western Australia

August 282014

Demonstrating the benefits of incorporating Enrich, the mixed forage system of perennial shrubs and inter-row pasture, into whole farm management.

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Pasture in Cropping Rotation

Pasture in Cropping Rotation

Nyabing, Western Australia

August 282014

Understanding the changes in soil pH and biology under a cereal/canola/cereal rotation as compared to a cereal/pasture/cereal rotation.

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Grazing Lebeckia on Sandy Soils

Grazing Lebeckia on Sandy Soils

Tincurrin, Western Australia

August 282014

Improving soil health and sheep production through establishment of the perennial legume “lebeckia” on non-wetting, deep sandy soils.

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Dryland Legume, Grass & Saltbush Trial

Dryland Legume, Grass & Saltbush Trial

Nyabing, Western Australia

August 272014

Re-vegetating low lying, partially saline agricultural land using saltbush and suitable pastures.

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Crop Nutrition Strategies

Crop Nutrition Strategies

Beaufort River, Western Australia

August 272014

Trialing alternative nutrient management strategies aimed at improving soil health and comparing to conventional approaches.

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Biological Tools in an Organic Vineyards

Biological Tools in an Organic Vineyards

Manjimup, Western Australia

August 272014

Using sheep and poultry to improve soil condition in an organic vineyard and orchard.

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Mulching for Microbes

Mulching for Microbes

Wagin, Western Australia

August 272014

Demonstration to determine if Oil Mallee chips, Straw, Perennials and Oat husk mulch will be an effective management strategy to assist in saline soil reclamation.

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Grazing-Cereals and Perennials

Grazing-Cereals and Perennials

Palgarup Western Australia

August 272014

Trialling techniques to establish grazing cereals and perennial pastures in one grazing system.

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Biological Farming Network

Biological Farming Network

Manjimup, Western Australia

August 272014

Creation of a biological farmers network to provide,support, training and demonstration of biological practises

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Revegetation, Grazing Saline Areas

Revegetation, Grazing Saline Areas

Darkan, Western Australia

August 272014

Re-vegetation and grazing using the Centre for Co-operative Research (saltland) Enrich, Saltbush Clones & salt-tolerant legume (messina) programs in the West Arthur Region

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Cell Grazing to Maintain Groundcover

Cell Grazing to Maintain Groundcover

Dumbleyung, Western Australia

August 272014

Using cell grazing and no till techniques in low rainfall areas to establish and maintain 100% ground cover, all year round by manipulating winter and summer crops.

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Balancing Phosphorus and Lime

Balancing Phosphorus and Lime

Kojonup, Western Australia

August 272014

Trialing the response of crops on soils with excess phosphorus and low pH to reduced phosphorus and increased lime application.

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Claying demonstration

Claying demonstration

Dumbleyung, Western Australia

August 272014

Incorporation of clay to improve soil structure, manage nutrient addition and improve productivity in the Dumbleyung area.

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Keyline Demonstration

Keyline Demonstration

Boyup Brook, Western Australia

August 272014

Demonstrating Keyline farming principles and fodder tree planting in the regeneration of farming land.

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Messina in Saltland Pastures

Messina in Saltland Pastures

Kojonup, Western Australia

August 272014

Improving the productivity of saline valley floors by combining the new salt and waterlogging tolerant legume messina with existing pastures.

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Double Fencing in Management of Salt Lands
August 272014

Double-fencing for sustainable grazing management aims to encourage reclamation of saline lands through a strategic fencing system.

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Better Rotations for Potato Production

Better Rotations for Potato Production

Kaloorup, Western Australia

August 272014

Trialing rotations to improve soil structure, soil health and potato quality

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Biochar and Avocados
August 272014

Productivity gains from biologically active soil initiated through biochar activated compost in an avocado orchard

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Summer Crops

Summer Crops

Katanning, Western Australia

August 272014

Trialling the viability of summer crops such as black sunflowers, sorghum and millet in the Katanning region

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Potatoes and Perennials
August 272014

Introducing diverse perennial pastures into potato/pasture rotations to improve soil health and pasture and potato yield and quality

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Dung Beetles and Grazing
August 272014

Dung beetles – delivering ecosystem services that improve grazing productivity

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Dairy Compost and Minerals

Dairy Compost and Minerals

Harvey, Western Australia

August 272014

Using compost and minerals to improve soil health, pasture production and quality

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Dairy Composting

Dairy Composting

Dardanup, Western Australia

August 272014

Measuring the soil health and financial benefits of both on-farm composting of farm waste resources and purchasing compost

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High Value Local Trees

High Value Local Trees

Mayanup, Western Australia

August 272014

Matching diverse local timber species to soils and trialing establishment techniques

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Perennial Pasture Establishment and Grazing

Perennial Pasture Establishment and Grazing

Manjimup, Western Australia

August 252014

Developing a resilient, long term perennial pasture to fill the autumn, early winter feed gap.

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Pasture Cropping into Kikuyu

Pasture Cropping into Kikuyu

Jingalup, Western Australia

August 252014

This project aims to test if pasture cropping of kikuyu in the southern wheat belt area is sustainable and how it impacts on crop yields, ground cover and nutrient retention.

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Beef Cattle Compost on Irrigated Pasture

Beef Cattle Compost on Irrigated Pasture

Scott River, Western AUstralia

August 232014

Beef cattle nutrition through the application of biological sprays and composts to irrigated pastures.

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Salt Tolerant Perennial Pastures

Salt Tolerant Perennial Pastures

Mindarabin, Western Australia

August 232014

Pasture production on saline soils to maintain groundcover levels.

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All Listing Types All Locations Any Rating

Listing Results

  • Profitability of crop production following various legume pastures in comparison to a chemical fallow

    Profitability of crop production following various legume pastures in comparison to a chemical fallow

    Cropping

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  • Comparison of the benefits of deep ripping with inclusion plates to 700mm across three typical Wheatbelt WA soil types.

    Comparison of the benefits of deep ripping with inclusion plates to 700mm across three typical Wheatbelt WA soil types.

    Cropping

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  • Understanding the implications of rotations in a low rainfall zone (Practice for Profit Trial)

    Understanding the implications of rotations in a low rainfall zone (Practice for Profit Trial)

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Spring sowing in the Wheatbelt for animal and crop production

    Spring sowing in the Wheatbelt for animal and crop production

    Grazing

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  • Comparing tillage practices to address non-wetting soils in the Corrigin area

    Comparing tillage practices to address non-wetting soils in the Corrigin area

    Cropping

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  • Tedera establishment and production in the Facey Grower Group (Wickepin) region

    Tedera establishment and production in the Facey Grower Group (Wickepin) region

    Grazing

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  • Assessing legume pasture varieties in combination with forage shrubs in the low rainfall eastern Wheatbelt.

    Assessing legume pasture varieties in combination with forage shrubs in the low rainfall eastern Wheatbelt.

    Grazing

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  • Understanding the implications of rotations in a low rainfall zone of the wheatbelt

    Understanding the implications of rotations in a low rainfall zone of the wheatbelt

    Cropping

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  • Earlier returns on investment using different sources of lime and deep ripping

    Earlier returns on investment using different sources of lime and deep ripping

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Soil testing to depth to better highlight subsoil acidification issues

    Soil testing to depth to better highlight subsoil acidification issues

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – South Dowerin

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – South Dowerin

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Waeel

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Waeel

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Wyalkatchem

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Wyalkatchem

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Wongan Hills

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Wongan Hills

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Goomalling

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Goomalling

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Southern Brook

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Southern Brook

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – York

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – York

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – York

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – York

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Southern Brook

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Southern Brook

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Northam

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Northam

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Doodenanning

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Doodenanning

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Wongan Hills

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Wongan Hills

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Goomalling

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Goomalling

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Meckering

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Meckering

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Waeel

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Waeel

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Beverley

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Beverley

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Tammin

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Tammin

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Bullaring

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Bullaring

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – York

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – York

    Cropping, Grazing

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  • Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Cunderdin

    Nutrient Use Efficiency Demonstration Site R3 – Cunderdin

    Cropping, Grazing

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  • Use of annual legume pastures as a tool to reclaim high weed burden/low fertility cropping areas in a low rainfall region

    Use of annual legume pastures as a tool to reclaim high weed burden/low fertility cropping areas in a low rainfall region

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Comparing Different Soil Amelioration Techniques to Improve Subsoil Acidity

    Comparing Different Soil Amelioration Techniques to Improve Subsoil Acidity

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Evergreen Perennial Pasture Establishment

    Evergreen Perennial Pasture Establishment

    Grazing

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  • Improving the Productivity of Old Saltbush Stands – Site 1

    Improving the Productivity of Old Saltbush Stands – Site 1

    Grazing

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  • Establishing and managing pasture species suitable for heavier soil types

    Establishing and managing pasture species suitable for heavier soil types

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Improving the Productivity of Old Saltbush Stands, Site 2

    Improving the Productivity of Old Saltbush Stands, Site 2

    Grazing

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  • Summer active soil scouting crops to improve canola establishment and yields on non-wetting sands

    Summer active soil scouting crops to improve canola establishment and yields on non-wetting sands

    Cropping

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  • Maximising forage potential within a sandalwood plantation

    Maximising forage potential within a sandalwood plantation

    Agroforestry, Grazing

    Read more
  • Fertiliser response in mid-rotation sandalwood plantations

    Fertiliser response in mid-rotation sandalwood plantations

    Agroforestry

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  • Bolt-on biological strategies for orchard soil health

    Bolt-on biological strategies for orchard soil health

    Horticulture

    Read more
  • Marron and micronutrients/humic acid

    Marron and micronutrients/humic acid

    Read more
  • Soil microbes & carbon for compost amended dairy pastures

    Soil microbes & carbon for compost amended dairy pastures

    Read more
  • Mapping Plant Available Water-Holding Capacity (PAWC) using EM and Radiometric Surveying

    Mapping Plant Available Water-Holding Capacity (PAWC) using EM and Radiometric Surveying

    Cropping

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  • Forage for the Feed Gap – getting high value feed from marginal land

    Forage for the Feed Gap – getting high value feed from marginal land

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Growing Australian Bush Foods With and Without Irrigation

    Growing Australian Bush Foods With and Without Irrigation

    Agroforestry

    Read more
  • Integrated grazing and cropping systems to soil type

    Integrated grazing and cropping systems to soil type

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Suitability of Rhagodia species to wheat and sheep farming in WA

    Suitability of Rhagodia species to wheat and sheep farming in WA

    Grazing

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  • Improving low rainfall cropping subsoils for better water use efficiency, better yield and improved soil health

    Improving low rainfall cropping subsoils for better water use efficiency, better yield and improved soil health

    Cropping

    Read more
  • The effect of organic based bio-stimulants on soil health and plant growth

    The effect of organic based bio-stimulants on soil health and plant growth

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Soil health improvements in established perennial forage sites.

    Soil health improvements in established perennial forage sites.

    Grazing

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  • Demonstrating principles of ameliorating sub surface pH to improve soil health

    Demonstrating principles of ameliorating sub surface pH to improve soil health

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Response and Availability of Potassium in Wheat Crops to Applications of Biochar

    Response and Availability of Potassium in Wheat Crops to Applications of Biochar

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Perennial Pasture Innovations in the Midwest

    Perennial Pasture Innovations in the Midwest

    Grazing

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  • Determining the Nutrient Requirements of Perennial Pastures when Grown with an Annual Legume Companion

    Determining the Nutrient Requirements of Perennial Pastures when Grown with an Annual Legume Companion

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Determining the Nutrient Requirements of Perennial Pastures when Grown with an Annual Legume Companion

    Determining the Nutrient Requirements of Perennial Pastures when Grown with an Annual Legume Companion

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Determining the Nutrient Requirements of Perennial Pastures when Grown with an Annual Legume Companion

    Determining the Nutrient Requirements of Perennial Pastures when Grown with an Annual Legume Companion

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Low Cost Improvement of Perennial Pastures

    Low Cost Improvement of Perennial Pastures

    Grazing

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  • Low Cost Improvement of Perennial Pastures

    Low Cost Improvement of Perennial Pastures

    Grazing

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  • Developing and Testing Innovative, Practical and Reliable Methods for Incorporating Lime into Acidic Sand Plain Subsoils

    Developing and Testing Innovative, Practical and Reliable Methods for Incorporating Lime into Acidic Sand Plain Subsoils

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Long Term Fertility Lesson for West Midlands Sands

    Long Term Fertility Lesson for West Midlands Sands

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Investigating subsoil constraints and how lime moves through the soil profile

    Investigating subsoil constraints and how lime moves through the soil profile

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Using Oil Mallee woodchips to increase soil carbon & biology

    Using Oil Mallee woodchips to increase soil carbon & biology

    Agroforestry, Cropping

    Read more
  • Comparing different farming techniques on valley floor compaction

    Comparing different farming techniques on valley floor compaction

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Intensive soil testing to depth following liming

    Intensive soil testing to depth following liming

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Using cattle feedlot solid waste to increase soil organic carbon and nutrient status

    Using cattle feedlot solid waste to increase soil organic carbon and nutrient status

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Innovative Amelioration and Water Management Strategies in the WA Wheatbelt Region

    Innovative Amelioration and Water Management Strategies in the WA Wheatbelt Region

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Soil testing to prepare for variable rate technology and to assess lime incorporation

    Soil testing to prepare for variable rate technology and to assess lime incorporation

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Urban waste compost demonstration

    Urban waste compost demonstration

    Cropping

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  • Blending poultry manure, biochar and forestry products to develop fertiliser and soil carbon for broadacre farms

    Blending poultry manure, biochar and forestry products to develop fertiliser and soil carbon for broadacre farms

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Benefits of a legume in sustainable farming systems

    Benefits of a legume in sustainable farming systems

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Moving towards microbial based agriculture

    Moving towards microbial based agriculture

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Testing to depth to see how ameliorants work through the profile and investigating possible subsoil constraints

    Testing to depth to see how ameliorants work through the profile and investigating possible subsoil constraints

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Creating a dual purpose biodiverse sandalwood and forage shrub grazing system

    Creating a dual purpose biodiverse sandalwood and forage shrub grazing system

    Agroforestry, Grazing

    Read more
  • Biodiverse Agroforestry – brushwood planting buffering native vegetation

    Biodiverse Agroforestry – brushwood planting buffering native vegetation

    Agroforestry

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  • Biodiverse Agroforestry – sandalwood and forage shrubs creating a wildlife corridor

    Biodiverse Agroforestry – sandalwood and forage shrubs creating a wildlife corridor

    Agroforestry

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  • Tree crops on saline land – Casuarina obesa with nitrogen fixing Frankia

    Tree crops on saline land – Casuarina obesa with nitrogen fixing Frankia

    Agroforestry

    Read more
  • Native grass establishment and grazing within an established sandalwood plantation

    Native grass establishment and grazing within an established sandalwood plantation

    Agroforestry, Grazing

    Read more
  • Biodiverse Agroforestry – biodiverse forage creating a wildlife corridor

    Biodiverse Agroforestry – biodiverse forage creating a wildlife corridor

    Agroforestry

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  • Biodiverse Agroforestry – Casuarina obesa creating a wildlife corridor

    Biodiverse Agroforestry – Casuarina obesa creating a wildlife corridor

    Agroforestry

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  • Biodiverse Agroforestry – increasing biodiversity values with oil mallees

    Biodiverse Agroforestry – increasing biodiversity values with oil mallees

    Agroforestry

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  • Carbon sequestration potential within a direct seeded sandalwood plantation

    Carbon sequestration potential within a direct seeded sandalwood plantation

    Agroforestry

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  • Biodiverse Agroforestry – sandalwood creating a wildlife corridor

    Biodiverse Agroforestry – sandalwood creating a wildlife corridor

    Agroforestry

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  • De Grey Rangelands Rehydration Demonstration Sites

    De Grey Rangelands Rehydration Demonstration Sites

    Grazing

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  • Upper Gascoyne Coir Logs Trial

    Upper Gascoyne Coir Logs Trial

    Grazing

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  • Cattle, Land and Fire

    Cattle, Land and Fire

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutritional Self Shepherding

    Nutritional Self Shepherding

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Nutritional Self Shepherding

    Nutritional Self Shepherding

    Grazing

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  • Nutritional Self Shepherding

    Nutritional Self Shepherding

    Grazing

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  • Reducing soil erosion and managing marginal soils in the Ravensthorpe area

    Reducing soil erosion and managing marginal soils in the Ravensthorpe area

    Grazing

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  • Nutrient systems trial for agricultural sustainability in the Western Fitzgerald Biosphere

    Nutrient systems trial for agricultural sustainability in the Western Fitzgerald Biosphere

    Cropping

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  • Nutrient systems trial for agricultural sustainability in the Western Fitzgerald Biosphere

    Nutrient systems trial for agricultural sustainability in the Western Fitzgerald Biosphere

    Cropping

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  • Reducing soil erosion through strategic revegetation and shelterbelts in the Western Fitzgerald Biosphere

    Reducing soil erosion through strategic revegetation and shelterbelts in the Western Fitzgerald Biosphere

    Cropping, Grazing

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  • Managing sandy blow-outs and non-wetting soils through claying

    Managing sandy blow-outs and non-wetting soils through claying

    Cropping

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  • Improving soil biology in the Torbay Catchment

    Improving soil biology in the Torbay Catchment

    Grazing

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  • Managing nutrient addition in the Wilson Inlet Catchment

    Managing nutrient addition in the Wilson Inlet Catchment

    Grazing

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  • Lime efficiency – determining lime responses from incorporating lime to manage top and subsoil acidity

    Lime efficiency – determining lime responses from incorporating lime to manage top and subsoil acidity

    Cropping

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  • Economic and scientific assessment of direct soil survey for soil acidity management

    Economic and scientific assessment of direct soil survey for soil acidity management

    Cropping

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  • Examining soil health on comparative demonstration plots post first and second rotation bluegum plantations

    Examining soil health on comparative demonstration plots post first and second rotation bluegum plantations

    Agroforestry, Grazing

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  • PA helping pH – Using precision agriculture technology for long term pH management

    PA helping pH – Using precision agriculture technology for long term pH management

    Cropping

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  • Bluegum realitiy – ensuring sustainable conversion of forestry land to crop and pasture

    Bluegum realitiy – ensuring sustainable conversion of forestry land to crop and pasture

    Agroforestry, Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Managing non-wetting soils in the Cranbrook area

    Managing non-wetting soils in the Cranbrook area

    Cropping

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  • Managing non-wetting soils in the Cranbrook area

    Managing non-wetting soils in the Cranbrook area

    Cropping

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  • Agroforestry, Cropping, Dairy, Grazing, Horticulture, Technology, Viticulture

    Read more
  • Manure on Salt Paddocks

    Manure on Salt Paddocks

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Alternative Fertiliser Treatments

    Alternative Fertiliser Treatments

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Stubble Retention

    Stubble Retention

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Enrich Mixed Forage System

    Enrich Mixed Forage System

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Pasture in Cropping Rotation

    Pasture in Cropping Rotation

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Grazing Lebeckia on Sandy Soils

    Grazing Lebeckia on Sandy Soils

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Dryland Legume, Grass & Saltbush Trial

    Dryland Legume, Grass & Saltbush Trial

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Crop Nutrition Strategies

    Crop Nutrition Strategies

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Biological Tools in an Organic Vineyards

    Biological Tools in an Organic Vineyards

    Viticulture

    Read more
  • Mulching for Microbes

    Mulching for Microbes

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Grazing-Cereals and Perennials

    Grazing-Cereals and Perennials

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Biological Farming Network

    Biological Farming Network

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Revegetation, Grazing Saline Areas

    Revegetation, Grazing Saline Areas

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Cell Grazing to Maintain Groundcover

    Cell Grazing to Maintain Groundcover

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Balancing Phosphorus and Lime

    Balancing Phosphorus and Lime

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Claying demonstration

    Claying demonstration

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Keyline Demonstration

    Keyline Demonstration

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Messina in Saltland Pastures

    Messina in Saltland Pastures

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Double Fencing in Management of Salt Lands

    Double Fencing in Management of Salt Lands

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Better Rotations for Potato Production

    Better Rotations for Potato Production

    Horticulture

    Read more
  • Biochar and Avocados

    Biochar and Avocados

    Horticulture

    Read more
  • Summer Crops

    Summer Crops

    Cropping

    Read more
  • Potatoes and Perennials

    Potatoes and Perennials

    Horticulture

    Read more
  • Dung Beetles and Grazing

    Dung Beetles and Grazing

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Dairy Compost and Minerals

    Dairy Compost and Minerals

    Dairy

    Read more
  • Dairy Composting

    Dairy Composting

    Dairy

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  • High Value Local Trees

    High Value Local Trees

    Agroforestry

    Read more
  • Perennial Pasture Establishment and Grazing

    Perennial Pasture Establishment and Grazing

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Pasture Cropping into Kikuyu

    Pasture Cropping into Kikuyu

    Cropping, Grazing

    Read more
  • Beef Cattle Compost on Irrigated Pasture

    Beef Cattle Compost on Irrigated Pasture

    Grazing

    Read more
  • Salt Tolerant Perennial Pastures

    Salt Tolerant Perennial Pastures

    Grazing

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